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COEL Student Handbook

COEL Student Handbook

 

College of Education and Leadership (COEL) Student Handbook

Table of Contents

University Mission Statement

Cardinal Stritch University, sponsored by the Sisters of St. Francis of Assisi and rooted in the liberal arts tradition, transforms lives and communities through servant leadership, learning, and service. The University is guided by the Catholic, Franciscan values of creating a caring community, peacemaking, showing compassion, and reverencing creation as we embrace and cultivate the diversity of all of God’s creation. http://www.stritch.edu/About/Mission-Vision

COEL Mission Statement

Transforming lives and communities by preparing leaders for learning and service.

Conceptual Framework of the COEL

Aligned with the mission of the institution and the college, the conceptual framework is devoted to bridging knowledge, practice, and service for the transformation of lives and communities. The College of Education and Leadership has undertaken the charge of making innovative revisions to already successful programs to better address the needs of the state for educators. More importantly, we have made it our mission to offer programs that ensure smooth and successful transition of our students through their programs of choice at different levels, so they can achieve their mission of becoming teachers and leaders of schools.

Commitment to Nondiscrimination

Cardinal Stritch University admits students of any race, color, national, and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national, and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic or other school-administered programs. The University is also committed to nondiscrimination on the basis of handicap, sexual orientation, creed, or sex.

Policies governing all programs

Students are required to abide by the policies and procedures stated in the University catalog. The Policies related to the Undergraduate programs can be found at the Undergraduate Catalog and the policies related to graduate students can be found at the graduate catalog.

Canvas Page for Each Program

Canvas is the Official Learning Management System of Cardinal Stitch University. A canvas page is available for each program. Students can find additional information specific to their program on their canvas page.

You can sign up to your Canvas account following instructions on this link: https://community.canvaslms.com/docs/DOC-10476-421273167.

 

Guideline and Policies for Teacher Candidates seeking Initial Licensure to teach at the Undergraduate (Elementary and Secondary) OR Graduate Level (Master of Arts in Teaching: MAT, MAIE or Master of Urban Education: MUE)

Licensure available: Early Childhood, Elementary, Secondary*, Special Education, Theater, ESL (for licensed teachers, or minor at the undergraduate level), and Bilingual (For MUE teacher candidates and added to an elementary licensure only)

*Different programs leading to a secondary licensure:

Programs offered at the undergraduate and graduate level Programs offered at the graduate level only
Art Broad Field Science
Biology Environmental Science
Broad Field Social Studies (includes Economics, Geography and Psychology French
Chemistry Physics
Computer Science  
English  
History  
Mathematics  
Political Science  
Sociology  
Spanish  
Theater  

The College of Education and Leadership offers programs leading to a teaching licensure and a degree at the undergraduate or Master’s Degree level. Students enrolled in these programs leading to teaching licensure are referred to, in this document, as “teacher candidates.” Teacher candidates can pursue licensure and degrees to teach at the elementary or secondary level or in specialized areas such as Reading Teacher (License # 316), special education teacher (license # 801) or ESL teachers (license #395).

Some programs are specifically designed for adult learners seeking licensure to teach at the post baccalaureate level, or practicing teachers working on a provisional licensure, or for Teach For America program teaching in urban schools. We also offer majors and minors leading to a bachelor’s degree with the possibility of adding a minor in ESL, Special Education, or Reading Teacher.

Programs leading to an initials teaching licensure are:
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education
Bachelor of Art in Secondary Education
Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT)
Master of Arts in Inclusive Education (leading to a License to teach as a regular and Special Education Teacher)
Master of Urban Education with Early Childhood Designation
Master of Urban Education with Special Education Designation
Master of Urban Education in Elementary and Bilingual Designation
All students pursuing licensure to teach must be admitted to the Teacher Education program. Admission to the teacher education program is different from admission to the University and takes place at different benchmarks designated by various programs. List of benchmarks and admission processes can be found in later sections of this document.

Cardinal Stritch University COEL Admission and Content Knowledge Policy Developed in response to the Wisconsin DPI Emergency Rule published on 6/17/2017

The Cardinal Stritch University Admission and Content Knowledge Policy is effective July 1, 2017.
Candidates who did not qualify for admission to the Teacher Education Program or qualify for student teaching prior to the emergency rule may contact their program advisor to determine their options under this new policy.

Admissions Policy
Undergraduate Initial Licensure Programs
Undergraduate initial licensure candidates apply to the Teacher Education program during Benchmark I. Candidates must have a 2.75 GPA (cumulative and major) to qualify for admission to the Teacher Education program. Candidates must demonstrate proficiency in the areas of reading, writing and mathematics by receiving a B- or higher in CA 101, EN 101 EN 102 and MT 195 (or higher). Transfer candidates who have completed an equivalent course for one or more of the Cardinal Stritch University courses must have received a minimum grade of B- or BC in the equivalent course in order to satisfy the requirement. Candidates who received credit for one or more of the Cardinal Stritch University courses via Advanced Placement (AP) testing are considered to have achieved the minimum required grade.

Undergraduate initial licensure candidates who do not meet the above requirements cannot be admitted to the Teacher Education program and may reapply when they meet the required conditions.

Additional admissions criteria are required and can be found in the “Cardinal Stritch University Requirements for Initial Licensure Program Progression” document.

Graduate Initial Licensure Programs
Graduate initial licensure candidates apply to their degree program concurrently with their application to the university. Candidates must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 from their bachelor’s degree institutions or a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 from their graduate degree institutions to qualify for admission to their program. Candidates must demonstrate proficiency in the areas of reading, writing and mathematics by verifying completion of the DPI General Education Requirements found in PI 34.15(7).

Graduate initial licensure candidates who have a 2.74 or lower cumulative GPA may be conditionally admitted to their degree program. Conditionally admitted candidates must earn a 3.0 or higher cumulative GPA after completing either their first semester of coursework or a minimum number of credits defined by their program to continue in the program.

Graduate initial licensure candidates apply to the Teacher Education Program during Benchmark I. Additional admissions criteria are required and can be found in the “Cardinal Stritch University Requirements for Initial Licensure Program Progression” document.

Content Knowledge Policy
Undergraduate Initial Licensure Programs
Undergraduate initial licensure candidates apply for student teaching during Benchmark II.

To verify their content knowledge and qualify for student teaching, candidates must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA and a 3.0 GPA in their major and in any licensable minors or concentrations. To further demonstrate content knowledge, candidates pursuing EC-MC Regular Education, MC-EA Regular Education, MC-EA Cross Categorical Special Education and EA-A Cross Categorical Special Education must verify completion of the DPI General Education Requirements found in PI 34.15(7) and complete the elementary/middle content methods and literacy courses required in their program with a minimum grade of B-.

Undergraduate initial licensure candidates who have a 2.99 or lower GPA (cumulative or major) must pass the appropriate Praxis II exam(s) for their licensure area(s) or successfully complete a content-based portfolio to verify their content knowledge and be considered for student teaching. These candidates must also receive an approved GPA appeal from the Teacher Education Committee to proceed with student teaching.

Additional criteria for student teaching qualification are required and can be found in the “Cardinal Stritch University Requirements for Initial Licensure Program Progression” document.

Graduate Initial Licensure Programs
Graduate initial licensure candidates apply for student teaching during Benchmark II.

Candidates seeking licensure in EC-MC Regular Education, MC-EA Regular Education, MC-EA Cross Categorical Special Education and EA-A Cross Categorical Special Education must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to verify their content knowledge. To further demonstrate content knowledge, candidates pursuing these license areas must verify completion of the DPI General Education Requirements found in PI 34.15(7) and complete the elementary/middle content methods and literacy courses required in their program with a minimum grade of B-.

Graduate initial licensure candidates in the above areas who have a 2.99 or lower cumulative GPA must develop a plan with their program advisor for meeting the 3.0 GPA requirement to qualify for graduation. Additionally, they must pass the appropriate Praxis II exam(s) for their licensure area(s) and receive an approved GPA appeal from the Teacher Education Committee to proceed with student teaching.

Candidates seeking EA-A and EC-A content area licensure must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA from the previous degree that contains the licensable major, minor or concentration.

Graduate initial licensure candidates seeking EA-A or EC-A content area licensure who have a 2.99 or lower cumulative GPA from the previous degree that contains the licensable major, minor or concentration may choose one of the following options to verify their content knowledge:

  • Provide documentation from their undergraduate institution that indicates a major GPA of 3.0 or higher for the licensable content area OR
  • Pass the appropriate Praxis II or World Language test for their content area

Additional criteria for student teaching qualification are required and can be found in the “Cardinal Stritch University Requirements for Initial Licensure Program Progression” document.

Requirements for Initial Licensure Program Admission and Progression

Undergraduate Teacher Education Programs

Teacher candidates apply to the Teacher Education Program (Benchmark I) after completion of ED 100, ED 205, EDSED 225, EDSED 317 and EDSED 340. EC-MC and MC-EA candidates must also complete RLA 307 and RLA 312.

Benchmark I – Admission to the Teacher Education Program

  • GPA Requirement: 2.75 cumulative and in licensable major(s) and licensable minor(s) and/or concentration(s)
  • Reading, Writing and Math Proficiency: To demonstrate proficiency in the areas of reading, writing and mathematics, candidates must receive a B- or higher in the following courses:
    • CA 101 Public Speaking
    • EN 101 Persuasive Writing
    • EN 102 Research Writing
    • MT 195 College Algebra (or higher)
  • Pathway Requirement (Skills and Dispositions): 1.5 average/4.0 scale for both University Supervisor and Cooperating Teacher evaluations

Benchmark II – Admission to Student Teaching

  • GPA Requirement: 3.0 cumulative and in licensable major(s) and licensable minor(s) and/or concentrations(s)
  • EC-MC/MC-EA Regular Education and MC-EA/EA-A Cross Categorical Special Education Verification of Math, Science, Social Studies, and English/Language Arts Content Knowledge Proficiency: Demonstrated through verification of completion of the DPI General Education Requirements found in PI 34.15(7) and completion of the elementary/middle content methods and literacy courses required in the program with a minimum grade of B-.
  • FORT Requirement: EC-MC Regular Education, MC-EA Regular Education, Cross Categorical Special Education (all levels) candidates must submit a passing score
  • Pathway Requirement (Skills and Dispositions): 2.0 average/4.0 scale for both University Supervisor and Cooperating Teacher evaluations

Candidates who have a 2.99 or lower GPA (cumulative or major or licensable minor) must:

  • Pass the appropriate Praxis II exam(s) for their licensure area(s) or successfully complete a content-based portfolio
  • Receive an approved GPA appeal from the Teacher Education Committee to proceed with student teaching

Benchmark III – Admission to the Profession

  • GPA Requirement: 3.0 cumulative and in licensable major(s) and licensable minor(s) and/or concentration(s)
  • edTPA Requirement: Passing score required
  • Pathway Requirement (Skills and Dispositions): 2.5 average/4.0 scale for both University Supervisor and Cooperating Teacher evaluations
  • Verification of proficiency for Wisconsin Teacher Standards 9 & 10

Master of Arts in Teaching & Master of Arts in Inclusive Education Programs

Teacher candidates are admitted to the degree program concurrently with admission to the university.

University Admissions Requirements

  • GPA Requirement: 2.75 cumulative or higher from bachelor’s degree institutions or 3.0 cumulative or higher from graduate degree institutions
  • Reading, Writing and Math Proficiency: Demonstrated through verification of completion of the DPI General Education Requirements found in PI 34.15(7)

Candidates who have a 2.74 or lower cumulative GPA may be conditionally admitted. Conditionally admitted candidates must earn a 3.0 or higher cumulative GPA after completing either their first semester of coursework or a minimum of five (5) credits to continue in the program.

Benchmark I - Admission to the Teacher Education Program

  • GPA Requirement: 3.0 cumulative
  • Coursework Requirement: a minimum of 4 credits which must include the following courses with a grade of B- or higher
    • EMA 530/531 Field Experience I
    • EMA 511/513 Fundamentals of Instruction & Assessment
  • Pathway Requirement (Skills and Dispositions): No minimum score required for both University Supervisor and Cooperating Teacher evaluations

Benchmark II – Admission to Student Teaching

  • GPA Requirement: 3.0 cumulative
    • Additional requirement for candidates seeking EA-A and EC-A with Content Area: 3.0 cumulative from the previous degree that contains the licensable major/minor/concentration
  • EC-MC/MC-EA Regular Education and MC-EA/EA-A Cross Categorical Special Education Verification of Math, Science, Social Studies, and English/Language Arts Content Knowledge Proficiency: Demonstrated through verification of completion of the DPI General Education Requirements found in PI 34.15(7) and completion of the elementary/middle content methods and literacy courses required in the program with a minimum grade of B-
  • Coursework Requirement: a minimum of 4 credits which must include the following courses with a grade of B- or higher:
    • EMA 570/571 or INED 510 Field Experience II
    • EMA 551/554 Advanced Methods
  • FORT Requirement:
    • EC-MC/MC-EA Regular Education and MC-EA Cross Categorical Special Education – passing score required
  • Pathway Requirement (Skills and Dispositions): 2.0 average/4.0 scale for both University Supervisor and Cooperating Teacher evaluations

Candidates who have a 2.99 or lower cumulative GPA must:

  • Develop a plan with their program advisor for meeting the 3.0 GPA requirement to qualify for graduation
  • Pass the appropriate Praxis II exam(s) for their licensure area(s)
  • Receive an approved GPA appeal from the Teacher Education Committee to proceed with student teaching

Candidates seeking EA-A or EC-A licensure in a content area who have a 2.99 or lower cumulative GPA from the previous degree that contains the licensable major/minor may choose one of the following options to verify their content knowledge:

  • Provide documentation from their undergraduate institution that indicates a major GPA of 3.0 or higher for the licensable content area OR
  • Pass the appropriate Praxis II or World Language test for their content area

Benchmark III – Admission to the Profession

  • GPA Requirement: 3.0 cumulative and major
  • edTPA Requirement: Passing score required
  • Pathway Requirement (Skills and Dispositions): 2.5 average/4.0 scale for both University Supervisor and Cooperating Teacher evaluations
  • Verification of proficiency for Wisconsin Teacher Standards 9 & 10

Details about each stage of the portfolio and the rubrics for evaluating them may be found in the licensure appropriate Canvas page.

A student can only submit a Portfolio for evaluation twice. If a student’s portfolio fails a second time, the student will be dropped from the program.

Master of Arts in Urban Education & Master of Arts in Urban Special Education Programs

Teacher candidates are admitted to the degree program concurrently with admission to the university.

University Admissions Requirements

  • GPA Requirement: 2.75 cumulative or higher from bachelor’s degree institutions or 3.0 cumulative or higher from graduate degree institutions
  • Reading, Writing and Math Proficiency: Demonstrated through verification of completion of the DPI General Education Requirements found in PI 34.15(7)

Candidates who have a 2.74 or lower cumulative GPA may be conditionally admitted. Conditionally admitted candidates must earn a 3.0 or higher cumulative GPA after completing either their first semester of coursework or a minimum of five (5) credits to continue in the program.

Benchmark I - Admission to the Teacher Education Program

  • GPA Requirement: 3.0 cumulative
  • Coursework Requirement: a minimum of 9 credits which must include the following courses with a grade of B- or higher:
    • MUE 513 Field Experience Urban I
    • MUE 512 Language, Literacy, and Learning
  • Pathway Requirement (Skills and Dispositions): 1.5 average/4.0 scale for University Supervisor evaluation

Benchmark II – Admission to Student Teaching

  • GPA Requirement: 3.0 cumulative
  • EC-MC/MC-EA Regular Education and MC-EA/EA-A Cross Categorical Special Education Verification of Math, Science, Social Studies, and English/Language Arts Content Knowledge Proficiency: Demonstrated through verification of completion of the DPI General Education Requirements found in PI 34.15(7) and completion of the elementary/middle content methods and literacy courses required in the program with a minimum grade of B-
  • Coursework Requirement: a minimum of 13 credits which must include the following courses with a grade of B- or higher:
    • MUE 533 Field Experience Urban Ed II
    • MUE 514 Language, Literacy, and Learning Upper Grades
  • FORT Requirement:
    • EC-MC/MC-EA Regular Education and MC-EA/EA-A Cross Categorical Special Education – passing score required
  • Pathway Requirement (Skills and Dispositions): 2.0 average/4.0 scale for University Supervisor evaluation

Candidates who have a 2.99 or lower cumulative GPA must:

  • Develop a plan with their program advisor for meeting the 3.0 GPA requirement to qualify for graduation
  • Pass the appropriate Praxis II exam(s) for their licensure area(s)
  • Receive an approved GPA appeal from the Teacher Education Committee to proceed with student teaching

Benchmark III – Admission to the Profession

  • GPA Requirement: 3.0 cumulative
  • edTPA Requirement: Passing score required
  • Pathway Requirement (Skills and Dispositions): 2.5 average/4.0 scale for both University Supervisor and Cooperating Teacher evaluations

Verification of proficiency for Wisconsin Teacher Standards 9 & 10

Teacher Education Committee (TEC)

Purpose of the Teacher Education Committee

The Teacher Education Committee oversees decision-making and communication regarding teacher certification.
Responsibilities:

  • Verifies that pre-service teachers have met requirements to advance to the professional sequence;
  • Verifies that teacher candidates have met requirements for student teaching;
  • Hears student appeals regarding requests for an undergraduate degree with a major in education without certification;
  • Hears student appeals regarding request for exceptions to current teacher education policy;
  • Advises certification programs (program evaluation);
  • Advises and makes recommendations when changes in curriculum are needed for additional certification/licenses;
  • Approves requests for student teaching through Credit for Prior Learning;
  • Recommends goals and policies for teacher education;
  • Reviews proposals for addition of new programs

Appeals to Teacher Education Committee

As stated in bullets 3 and 4 above, teacher candidates my appeal to the Teacher Education Committee if they disagree with a decision or when they believe they have a case to request an extension of time to meet a requirement or any other circumstance.

Grade Policy

Undergraduate Students:

No grade lower than a "C" will be accepted in Education courses (including ED, EDSED, RLA, and SED courses). Students may repeat a course with an unacceptable grade only once. A second unacceptable grade in the program (including ED, EDSED, RLA and SED courses) eliminates the student from the major and/or minor. Any student who is eliminated from the major or a minor may follow the Education department appeal process to be readmitted to the major. Please see the “Undergraduate Teacher Education Program Appeal Procedure” outlined on TEC section of this Handbook for more information. Also any student who is denied admission to the Advanced Professional Sequence or student teaching may follow the appeal process as stated in the Cardinal Stritch University Undergraduate Catalog at http://www.stritch.edu/Academics/Catalog.

Graduate Students:

Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 at all times. Teacher education candidates need a grade of B- in order to pass a course. However, a grade of B- has a value lower than a 3.0. Should graduate teacher candidates receive a B-, they should earn higher grades in other course(s) in the same semester order to maintain the 3.0 GPA. A GPA lower than 3.0 will lead to a probationary status and if not improved in a semester, the teacher candidate will be dismissed from the program.

edTPA

All teacher candidates pursuing an initial licensure in the state of Wisconsin must complete, submit, and pass an edTPA portfolio. The edTPA assessments will be administered by Pearson Higher Education http://www.edtpa.aacte.org.

Specific information regarding the edTPA assessments and handbooks will become available as the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction releases this information to higher education institutions. Students will submit their edTPA assessment through LiveText. Support for the edTPA will be given throughout certification programs at Stritch. Cardinal Stritch University faculty will prepare students for the edTPA by giving feedback on video lessons and written work before the student enters student teaching. The feedback and scores given on rubrics prior to student teaching is not a guarantee on how students will score on their official edTPA submission. Students will have the opportunity to review edTPA rubrics and handbooks prior to student teaching. Once the student enters student teaching, faculty will not give any feedback on the student's official edTPA submission. Students are responsible for the quality of their work and the final score received for their submitted performance assessment.

edTPA Retake Policy

General Information
The Teacher Education Division (TED) will set a specific edTPA submission day for each semester.

  • Teacher candidates who submit after the submission day may not be eligible for retake support during their student teaching semester.
  • Teacher candidates with extenuating circumstances may appeal to their program chair.

If a teacher candidate does not pass due to a condition code, they can correct and resubmit right away if that condition code was due to a technical issue.
Resources available for teacher candidates who need to submit an edTPA retake:

  • edTPA Retake Instructions for Candidates (available through edTPA.com)
  • Review of Low Scoring edTPAs and Guidance for Retakes (available through SCALE)

Retake Process
The following retake process has been established for teacher candidates who do not pass the edTPA on their first attempt:

  1. The edTPA Coordinator will notify a teacher candidate via email when a failing score is received and give him/her the retake plan information.
  2. The edTPA Retake Committee will meet to determine recommendations for the teacher candidate’s retake. The committee will consult the current edTPA retake decision-making and support guidelines (available through SCALE) as a reference when determining recommendations.
  3. The teacher candidate will meet with representatives from the edTPA Retake Committee for a reflective conversation regarding the retake recommendations. The goal of the reflective conversations is to help the teacher candidate determine opportunities to develop, practice or demonstrate identified areas of weakness, and to discuss new edTPA materials needed for submission and scoring. The reflective conversation may include discussion about the teacher candidate’s strengths, as well as areas for improvement.
  4. One, two or three task retakes are available through Pearson. The edTPA Retake Committee will help each teacher candidate determine the retake option that is the best choice for his/her retake situation.
  5. Teacher candidates who choose not to follow the committee’s recommendations may not be eligible for retake support during their student teaching semester.

Undergraduates Taking Graduate Courses

Each department will designate graduate courses that could accommodate undergraduate students. Courses not approved for undergraduate enrollment may be subject to student appeal. This appeal should be made in person with the program chair and/or the course instructor present. Undergraduates may enroll in graduate classes but only undergraduate credit will be awarded.

Field Experiences

All teacher candidates will complete field experience prior to clinical experience or student teaching. The number of hours completed as field experience varies depending on whether teacher candidates are pursuing licensure at the graduate or undergraduate level and also varies for graduate teacher candidates who are teaching on a provisional licensure and are teachers of record or work as a para-professional in a classroom. For additional details about field experience and clinical practice please refer to the Canvas page developed for your program of study.

Required Documentation for Field Experiences

Background Check

Prior to any field experience and student teaching, a criminal background check is required from every teacher candidate. Information is confidential and processed by the Certified Background.com and reported to the Director of Field Experience and Clinical. Information may be shared with the chair of the applicable teacher preparation program (Teacher Education Policy, 2006). Candidates should be aware that some districts and schools require candidates to participate additionally in the district’s own background check process.

TB Skin Test

Some schools/districts may require TB test results from candidates placed in their schools for the Student Teaching experience, however, they are no longer a state requirement for student teaching.

Districts which require TB test results from candidates will notify the candidate or Office of Field Experience & Clinical if a TB test is required for the placement.

The Stritch Health Center offers free TB Test clinics for all Stritch students each semester. Students may have the test completed for free with a valid student ID. The dates and times for the TB Test Clinics will be provided to students as soon as they become available.

Field Experience Placement Information

The Office of Field Experience and Clinical is responsible for placing all teacher candidates who are not working at a school as teacher of record. Cardinal Stritch University is committed to providing our teacher candidates with opportunities to practice in a variety of different districts with diverse populations of students and teachers. The candidate will be placed in Stritch’s partner schools in different content areas, grade levels, and socio-economic and cultural settings, in both public and private schools. Field experience placements will be within approximately 25 miles one-way from the Cardinal Stritch University area. All candidates are placed in Stritch partner schools for Field Experiences. Partner school experiences allow Stritch faculty to observe and provide feedback to candidates in their pre-student teaching experiences. Student Teaching placements will be within 25 miles of the teacher candidate’s residence.

Expectations with each Field Experience

With each field experience, teacher candidate will gradually take on more of the teacher role, ultimately preparing them to become a successful full time teacher during student teaching. Teacher candidates are encouraged to participate in a variety of activities that will expose them to all aspects of the teaching profession. A teacher candidate is assigned to a classroom teacher, referred to as the mentor teacher (formerly known as cooperating teacher). The candidate is required to help the mentor or cooperating teacher with specific tasks that will be outlined for each field experience and eventually teach lessons to small groups and later to the whole class. In each course where field experiences are required, the instructor will review the expectations and requirements of the field experience component.

Transportation to and from the field experience partnership site is the full responsibility of the Teacher Candidate. Some candidates arrange carpooling with other candidates in the FE class. See the Office of Field Experience if candidate requires public transportation information.

Student Teaching / Clinical Practice

All teacher candidates enrolled in a teacher preparation program must complete student teaching or clinical practice. The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction defines Student Teaching as “full days for a full semester,” or about 20 weeks.

Eligibility for Student Teaching

Student Teaching is the culminating semester long experience of the teacher education program. During the semester just prior to student teaching, Teacher Candidates will start the student teaching application process and complete the requirements listed below. Meeting these requirements is monitored by the Office of Field Experience and Clinical, Program Advisors, and off-campus Chairs. Once all requirements are satisfied, Teacher Candidates will receive final confirmations of (a) student teaching placement(s). Student teaching placement information is provided to the Teacher Candidate no earlier than the first week in May (fall) and the first week in December (spring) [exceptions may be made if a school district requests an interview with the candidate/s].

The following requirements must be satisfied prior to student teaching:

  • Complete all education courses with a grade in each course which meets program requirements. Teacher Candidates must have a minimum, cumulative GPA of 3.0.
  • Complete all academic coursework required for certifiable major or minor, if applicable. (Completion of the major/minor requirements are signed off by the major/minor chair or Program Advisor on the appropriate form.)
  • Candidates complete and document at least 100 hours of field experiences.
  • If applicable, pass appropriate Praxis II exam(s) and submit scores before or during student teaching application process. Check with the Program Advisor or off-campus program Chair for due dates.
  • Pass Foundations of Reading examination (for candidates completing programs and applying for licensure after January 31, 2014). Check with the Program Advisor or off-campus program Chair for score requirement and due dates.
  • Teacher Candidate Background Checks
    • The College of Education and Leadership requires students in initial certification teacher preparation programs to undergo criminal background checks. The checks are done previous to experiences in the field in P-12 schools to ensure protection to our partner schools and pupils.
    • The University must keep a record of the background check; therefore, candidates who are completing field experiences on-the-job must also participate in the background check process because the district of employment is not permitted to share its background check due to privacy law.
    • The background checks must be completed prior to the start of the candidate’s first field experience course and again before the student teaching semester.
    • Background checks are completed online through a criminal background check vendor. The complete online background check includes:
      • The initial background check will include a national criminal background search
        • Background checks for candidates who are not US citizens may include an international background check from the country of origin. Candidate may be responsible for extra costs.
        • An electronic criminal history search from the Department of Justice Crime Information Bureau
    • If the criminal background check should show a criminal background, the candidate is informed that this may prevent him/her from placement in P-12 school environments and affect his/her completing clinical course requirements and eligibility for licensure.
    • Candidates may provide their own background check records (electronically via the electronic background check vendor) to districts or schools which require information. Candidates should be aware that some districts and schools require candidates to participate additionally in the district’s own background check process.
  • Student Teaching Applications
    • Candidates will complete a student teaching application during a one-on-one meeting with the Placement Coordinator which will take place in a course which meets early the semester prior to student teaching (Fall – late January, Spring – September).
    • On-the-Job Student Teaching Applications – Complete the student teaching application provided by Placement Coordinator, and submit principal and other appropriate recommendations and supporting documents.

Due dates are determined by the Director of Field Experience and Clinical.

Options for a non-traditional student teaching placement:

Student Teaching Abroad

Teacher Candidates can apply to complete student teaching in another country (student teaching abroad). Interested teacher candidates should contact the Office of Field Experience to complete an ‘Intent to student-teach abroad’ form and receive the eligibility rubric. Candidates are assessed for eligibility to participate in the student teaching abroad program based on attendance, progress in courses and fieldwork, and applicability to certification. Candidates will then be directed to the Office of International Studies to explore available programs. Generally the Student Teacher will complete a ten-week placement in SE Wisconsin first and complete his/her second placement overseas. Because of the planning involved and organization required for student teaching abroad, students are encouraged to apply for student teaching abroad at least one year prior to the expected student teaching semester. Because many schools abroad do not follow the state’s school schedule, students may need to complete the student teaching abroad in a time that exceeds the traditional semester. In this case, the student will receive an incomplete and the grade for student teaching will be posted upon completion of the placement abroad.

Internship

Cardinal Stritch University participates in the DPI’s Wisconsin Improvement Program (WIP) for pre-service teachers. School districts may choose to contract with DPI-WIP to offer internships. Internships are not offered by all Wisconsin school districts. A WIP intern is hired by a participating school district at a minimal salary and assumes a partial teaching assignment. The assignment usually involves 50 percent of the workload of a certified teacher in the district. The intern is assigned a variety of instructional duties; planning, teaching, observing, and conferring with colleagues. The actual workload of an intern will vary, depending on the program worked out by team members, but the intern generally works more independently of the Cooperating Teacher than the traditional Student Teacher. Availability and type of internships offered by districts through WIP vary from semester to semester. Interested teacher candidates should contact the Office of Field Experience to complete an ‘Internship Application” and receive the eligibility rubric. Candidates are assessed for eligibility to participate in the student teaching internship program based on attendance, progress in courses and fieldwork, faculty recommendation, and applicability to certification (i.e. appropriate internship opportunities may not be available for dual certification candidates). Candidates are assessed upon application and again before the student teaching semester. Candidates who are interning with the WIP program must obtain a Wisconsin intern license (at candidate’s cost) through the Office of Field Experience and Clinical. *Candidates should be aware that the term ‘intern’ is sometimes inadvertently used to represent ‘student teacher.’ WIP internship is the only interning program for student teaching in the state of Wisconsin. Contact the Office of FE for more information.

In-service Student Teaching

For those Teacher Candidates who have had five years of teaching experience in one to two schools in the area in which they seek certification, Cardinal Stritch University acknowledges that experience with in-service student teaching (credit for prior learning). If you believe you may be eligible for in-service student teaching, contact the Director of Field Experience and Clinical for an application and details on this option.

Student Teaching Placement Information

Teachers of record enrolled in MAT/MAIE, MUE, and Urban Special Ed programs conduct their student teaching in their own classroom and are supervised by a University Supervisor designated by the Office of Field Experience and Clinical.

Traditional students enrolled in the undergraduate program and the MAT/MAIE program will be placed at a school setting by the Office of Field Experience and Clinical. Teacher candidates will not be placed in schools from which they graduated or where they have children, siblings, or close friends enrolled or employed.

Teacher Candidates are assigned one or two placements, depending on certification, previous field experiences, and availability of Cooperating Teachers. All Teacher Candidates are required to attend the Professional Development Seminar (EMA604, ED495), which is scheduled during the student teaching semester.

Placement of teacher candidates are based on the following criteria:

  1. Candidate’s certification area
  2. Experiences with children in a variety of grade levels
  3. Experiences with children from different socio-economic levels
  4. Experiences with children from a variety of cultures
  5. Experiences with children with varying degrees of academic, social, emotional and physical abilities

Overall, the Teacher Candidate’s placements are in a variety of urban, and suburban and/or rural environments.

Placements may be in public, charter, or private school environments.

Field experience and student teaching placements will be within approximately 25 miles one-way from the Cardinal Stritch University area / Stritch site area.
Student teaching candidates may apply for an out-of-area student teaching placement providing other field experience placement requirements have been met. Candidate input on out-of-area student teaching placement will be considered, but suggested areas cannot be guaranteed. Extra charges may be required for out-of-area supervision.

Placements are based on availability of Cooperating Teachers who meet DPI criteria and have been recommended by their principal or district administrator as models of best practice. It is important to note that Cooperating Teachers may choose whether they prefer one quarter or one semester placements. It is important for candidates to keep in mind the numerous reasons a school or district can or cannot accept student placements and that school and district availability varies from semester to semester.

It is important for the candidate to understand that a range of experiences (districts and grade levels) is seen as a positive to potential employers – they will neither expect you to have student taught in the district nor in the grade level of the potential position. Districts, schools and their personnel change constantly – if you demonstrate that you can teach in different settings and in 5th grade one year and 2nd the next, this is a plus!

It is strictly prohibited for students to contact schools regarding placements in any way. Schools and districts depend on the University to complete the details of the placement process with the Teacher Candidate, to contact the appropriate personnel, and to follow district and/or school protocol.

Policies for On-the-Job (OTJ) placements:

Placements are made with the intention of giving the Teacher Candidates multiple experiences that will shape their professional development. Professional educators are qualified to teach all students. Experiences in the field in Stritch teacher preparation programs will provide some of those experiences.

  • Teacher Candidates employed by a school / school district may complete some part or all of the field experiences and clinical practice within the school in which they are employed when their teaching situation matches the certification level they seek.
  • Candidates must inform the Placement Coordinator of their On-The-Job (OTJ) status during the advising process or before the first course in the program
    • Candidates in field experiences and clinical student teaching practice complete an OTJ application, providing information on current employment position (including classroom description, years of employment, certification seeking, grade level/subject area of field experience or clinical placement, mentor/cooperating teacher’s name and contact information, administrator name and contact information, and plan for supervision by the mentor/cooperating teacher)
    • Application for candidates who wish to complete student teaching on-the-job includes:
      1. Submission of recommendation form from the building administrator
      2. Letter on school letterhead with original signature from building administrator approving the OTJ experience and acknowledging that candidate will complete the full day, full semester student teaching experience while employed
      3. Letter from district administration (Human Resources Department or District Administration) approving the OTJ experience and parameters set forth by the building administrator

Additional information for candidates who are employed as Instructional Aides or Paraprofessionals:

  • Requirements above apply to candidates employed as Instructional Aides or Paraprofessionals
  • Candidates shall complete field experience expectations outside of their duties as Aide/Para – candidates shall teach according to program expectations

Candidates who are employed as Instructional Aides or Paraprofessionals must arrange the field experience and clinical student teaching situations to accommodate student teaching in the area in which s/he seeks certification for full days for the full semester. The candidate’s employer (building and district administration) and Cooperating Teacher must recognize (in writing) that the candidate will switch roles with the Cooperating Teacher and will not complete paraprofessional/aide duties during the student teaching time period (full days according to teachers’ hours, for a full semester). Aide/para tasks must be completed during the candidate’s prep or outside of the school day at the candidate’s/school’s arrangement.

OTJ placements for candidates in this position will only be approved when appropriate paperwork has been submitted from the Principal, Director of Pupil Services or other district administrator, and Cooperating Teacher verifying their understanding of the ‘full days for a full semester’ student teaching situation.

Requirements and Expectations of the Student Teacher

  • Undergraduate (UGTE) program candidates are required to apply for graduation by the due date set by the Registrar. Contact the Program Advisor / Office of the Registrar to obtain an application. It is important to note that the degree conferral date is the last date of student teaching (rather than the date of graduation).
  • The student teaching experience requires full-day participation at the assigned school for one P-12 full semester (the student teaching semester does not follow the Stritch semester calendar). P-12 semester calendars vary by district.
  • Transportation to and from the student teaching placement is the full responsibility of the Teacher Candidate. If candidate is using public transportation, inform the Office of Field Experience so that a placement near a bus line can potentially be arranged.
  • Teaching experience begins with a minimal period of observation with increasing opportunities for teaching responsibilities until the Teacher Candidate is teaching independently (in the presence of the Cooperating Teacher) for the remainder of the placement. (See Student Teaching Sequence of Events for traditional student).
  • Student teaching includes opportunities to observe other teachers when and where possible, as planned with the Cooperating Teacher, generally at the end of the experience.
  • Student teaching includes participation in related teaching activities (playground duty, bus duty, cafeteria duty, faculty meetings, student advisory, IEP meetings, parent-teacher conferences, open house events, other school and community events, etc.) as required by the teacher contract and/or at the discretion of the Cooperating Teacher.
    • School trips outside of the school day/evening which the Teacher Candidate is asked to chaperone must be cleared by the University. Trips are reviewed on a case by case basis to determine the liability risk to the Student Teacher and University. Contact the Office of Field Experience and Clinical and/or direct the school/Cooperating Teacher to contact the Office as soon as plans are presented.
  • Student teaching includes continual conferencing with the Cooperating Teacher for feedback and support.
  • Student teaching includes scheduled observations and conferences with the University Supervisor.
  • The Student Teacher is required to write lesson plans.
    • All elements of effective instruction and assessment are evident in the candidate’s lesson plans. In the Student Teaching experience, it is recommended that the Teacher Candidate continue to use RIO and/or IDP planning protocols – however, the Cooperating Teacher and Student Teacher should determine collaboratively the type of lesson planning model that best fits their situation.
      • Lesson plans for all classes taught by the Teacher Candidate require prior approval from the Cooperating Teacher. Teacher Candidate should plan to review tentative plans with the Cooperating Teacher at least a week prior to when they are to be taught.
      • An organized collection of lesson plans for each day with brief reflections (binder, file box…) is required throughout the semester and will be reviewed by the University Supervisor during all visits – candidate must arrange for its easy access by the Supervisor. Additional recommended documents for the University Supervisor’s review may include IEPs at a Glance and current classroom management plan.
    • The candidate will provide the University Supervisor with the Pre-Observation Lesson Plan (form) 24 hours prior to all visits so that the supervisor can have some familiarity with the lesson he/she will be observing
  • Attendance at the EMA604 or ED495 Professional Development Seminar is mandatory. This course is generally the only coursework the Student Teacher will carry. The Teacher Candidate will receive the schedule of classes at Student Teaching Orientation – and should provide dates to the Cooperating Teacher as soon as possible. **Important note: the candidate retains normal responsibilities (i.e. lesson planning, preparation of materials, coverage for duties, etc.) in his or her placement for any time missed due to the course – and leaves the placement school no earlier than the time required to drive to campus (generally 30 minutes).
  • Teacher Candidates may not receive payment from the school for any duty which would take place during the official school day. Candidates may receive payment for duties taking place outside of the school day only. Such duties may not interfere with any part of the school day. Teacher Candidates should report any departure from this policy to the Office of Field Experience and Clinical or off-campus Chair immediately.
  • All Cardinal Stritch students have limited liability coverage both on and off university premises. Any incident will be reviewed based on university policy.
  • Absences:
    • Although there are no (0) “sick days” or “personal days” in student teaching, absences from your placement may be excused for personal illness and/or death(s) in your immediate family. Documentation may be required.
    • Student Teaching is a program course, therefore absences must be recorded by the University. Absences from your placement must be reported the morning of the absence (or earlier) to your Cooperating Teacher, University Supervisor, and Office of Field Experience and Clinical (3 calls/emails) so they can be recorded.
    • A record of absences is kept by the Cooperating Teacher, University Supervisor and the Office of Field Experience and Clinical – if absences from student teaching result in completion of less than the full semester of student teaching required by the Wisconsin DPI, the Director of Field Experience and Clinical will contact the student, Cooperating Teacher, and University Supervisor to arrange an extension of the placement if possible (other plans, including summer school, will be explored during Spring semester student teaching experiences).
    • Any absences beyond 1 day from Professional Development Seminar will require the candidate to attend the parallel course EMA604/ED495 or course session at another Stritch site as a make-up session. These make-up sessions must be completed by the end of your Student Teaching semester. Failure to do this will result in receiving a grade of incomplete, which makes you ineligible for licensure.
    • Medical Condition: Cardinal Stritch University and the Student Success Center are committed to supporting the letter and spirit of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (2013). We strive for equal and uninterrupted access to all our curriculum, programs and services.
      • When a teacher candidate experiences an extended illness, significant psychological problem, pregnancy or potentially serious medical condition during student teaching, assurance that the student is capable of performing the essential functions of the program, with or without reasonable accommodations, is imperative. Accordingly, Stritch requires individuals with compromised immune systems and pregnant individuals to notify Stritch of such condition(s), so that appropriate precautions and accommodations can be discussed
      • When a student has a compromised immune system or is pregnant, it is the responsibility of the student to inform the instructor or program chairperson supervising the program at the earliest opportunity. Documentation in the form of a letter from the student’s physician or primary healthcare provider stating that the student is capable of performing the essential functions of the student’s program, with or without reasonable accommodations is recommended. The documentation should include a description of the student’s functional limitations as a result of the condition and recommendations for dealing with the condition’s impact on the student’s physical activities (such as necessary time away from class or fieldwork) and academic activities (class notes, extended time, or alternative path to completion). Such documentation should also include any restrictions (e.g., lifting, chemical exposure) the student may have during the condition or pregnancy. Clinical/field placement faculty will attempt to accommodate students with any weight restrictions on lifting, and otherwise as appropriate.
      • Students with disabilities, pregnant, or parenting students seeking accommodations should contact the Accessibility Services Office (in the Student Success Center) at Bonaventure Hall Suite 1058 or 414-410-4828.
    • Job interviews should be scheduled late afternoons or early mornings. No more than two interviews should be scheduled within the semester since it is considered an absence.
  • Substitute teaching: The Department of Public Instruction and Cardinal Stritch University do not permit unlicensed teachers to serve as substitute teachers at any time nor are licensed interns permitted to assume responsibilities beyond the limits of an approved internship design. If the Cooperating Teacher is absent, the Student Teacher Candidate is not permitted to serve as the substitute teacher – a substitute teacher must be assigned to the classroom. Substitute teaching during student teaching is prohibited, even for candidates with a substitute teaching permit/license, because it can create a liability issue. Departures should be reported to the Office of FE or program Chair as soon as possible.
  • Demonstrate the Attitudes and Dispositions of a Professional Educator
    • Contact the Cooperating Teacher at the earliest appropriate opportunity; arrange to meet well before the semester
    • Request copies of school’s faculty and student handbooks from the Cooperating Teacher
    • Candidate should introduce him/herself to the Administration, other school professionals, administrative assistants, custodians, etc.
      • Ask the building administrator whether s/he is able to schedule a time to observe him/her teaching.
    • Begin the semester in attendance at In-service and Orientation events the week/s prior to the students’ first day
    • Become familiar with all equipment and technology used in the classroom.
    • Become acquainted with all teaching materials and district / grade level curricula
    • Be at school at the expected time (or earlier) and stay as long as the Cooperating Teacher (or longer)
    • Become well-acquainted with the daily schedule as soon as possible
    • Attend to professional appearance as a pre-service teacher, and professional social media presence
    • Accept and use feedback from the Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor in the spirit in which it was meant – to improve teaching practice
    • Exhibit an ‘attitude of gratitude’ toward the Cooperating Teacher. The Student Teacher is a guest in the classroom. The Cooperating Teacher is ultimately responsible for the success of his/her students – and has chosen to give back to the profession by spending extra time and effort mentoring and coaching students entering the profession.
  • Build a relationship with the University Supervisor
    • It is the Teacher Candidate’s responsibility to call/email his/her supervisor(s) to set up visits and observations. The candidate must have at least 2 informal and 4 formal observations from the primary supervisor (state requirement).
    • The University Supervisor will make scheduled appointments upon hearing from the candidate.
      • The initial informational visit should be within the first week or two of the semester, so the candidate must arrange this as soon as possible. The initial visit allows the candidate and the supervisor to become acquainted with the Cooperating Teacher.
      • The Teacher Candidate (in consultation with the Cooperating Teacher) and the supervisor will then schedule the observation visits. There may be an occasion for an unannounced visit.
    • The supervisor(s) will make six to eight observation visits over the semester. Additional visits will be made if necessary. Each formal observation is at least 45 minutes in length. The Supervisor is permitted to visit unannounced except for formal observation/evaluation visits.
    • The candidate will provide the University Supervisor with the Pre-Observation Lesson Plan 24 hours prior to his/her visit so that the supervisor can have some familiarity with the lesson he/she will be observing
    • Regular communication with the University Supervisor is expected – he/she will inform the Teacher Candidate of communication expectations at the first meeting.
    • An organized collection of lesson plans with brief reflections (binder, file box…) is required throughout the semester and will be reviewed by the University Supervisor during all visits – it is the candidate’s responsibility to pre-arrange for its easy access by the Supervisor.
    • Part of each observational visit will be devoted to a conference between the University Supervisor, Cooperating Teacher, and Student Teacher. It is important that the candidate arranges supervisor visits at appropriate times so that the Cooperating Teacher is available to take part in the post-observation meeting – the ‘triad’ conference is required (candidate and/or supervisor must contact the Office of Field Experience and Clinical if the triad conference is not taking place). Discussion about the observation of the candidate’s role in the classroom, the written evaluation by the Cooperating Teacher (CT Pathway) and the written evaluation by the supervisor (US Pathway) will take place. It is expected that the candidate maintains a positive and cooperative attitude during these conferences in accepting and using feedback.
    • At or after the Week 8 and Week 14 observation, the Teacher Candidate and Supervisor (with input from the Cooperating Teacher, if applicable), will devise an action plan based on the observation discussion for the time between visits – most often, the action plan will be based on Pathway components scored at the ineffective and minimally effective levels or not observed. The Supervisor and Teacher Candidate will determine an appropriate plan which may include research on a particular area, reflection on an aspect of a lesson, video-taping a short teaching segment, et al., to improve the candidate’s practice. The formative assessment/action plan will be notated on the Student Teaching Observation form.
      • The pre-observation Lesson Plan from each observation will be submitted as part of the Benchmark III Portfolio
      • The Student Teaching Observation Form (including Action Plan) from each observation will be submitted as part of the Benchmark III Portfolio (and electronically submitted as an attachment with the Supervisor’s Pathway)
    • Professional Development Seminar (EMA604/ED495) dates may allow for time to meet with the Supervisor along with his/her other Student Teachers – see your Professional Development Seminar schedule.

The supervisor will provide the Teacher Candidate with a letter of recommendation. Note: the Cooperating Teacher is not required to write a letter of recommendation -- it is the candidate’s responsibility to ask for one from him/her.

Policies related to all Field Experiences and Clinical Practice/Student Teaching

All communication from the Office of Field Experience will occur through Wolfmail. Candidates are expected to reply to all Stritch correspondence within 48 hours of original correspondence so that matters can be handled effectively.

Field experiences must occur within the content and grade level(s) of certification desired.

Expectations of the Teacher Candidate in the Field:

Demonstrate the Attitudes and Dispositions of a Professional Educator

  • Contact your mentor/cooperating teacher at the earliest appropriate opportunity – telephone and email, follow-up if necessary after an appropriate period of time
  • Maintain a high level of communication with your mentor/cooperating teacher
  • Schedule your field experience visits with your mentor/cooperating teacher
  • Attend field experiences at the agreed upon date and time
  • Arrive in a timely manner
  • Attend to your appearance as a pre-professional, pre-service teacher
  • Be prepared to participate in classroom practices as you and your mentor/cooperating teacher have arranged
  • Interact with the school community: students, mentor/cooperating teacher, CT’s peer and team teachers, other school professionals, administrators
  • Participate in classroom practices outside of the school day when possible
  • Approve lesson plans and seek feedback from your mentor/cooperating teacher on lessons well before teaching
  • Field experiences include scheduled observations and conferences with the instructor / supervisor and may include submitting video recordings of your teaching
  • Power off cell phones and other electronic devices in the field unless being used for educational purposes in a lesson the candidate delivers
  • Transportation to and from the field experience placement is the full responsibility of the Teacher Candidate.
  • Teacher Candidates are not to be used as substitute teachers in the absence of the Cooperating Teacher under any circumstances (liability issue, see p. 30 for details).
  • Teacher Candidates should report suspected child abuse to the Cooperating Teacher. S/He will report to authorities following district policy and procedures. It is advisable for the ST to discuss concerns with the University Supervisor.
  • Teacher Candidates should always meet with students and/or parents in a visible public location within the school building. Special care must be taken to ensure that the Cooperating Teacher is aware of all the candidate’s interactions with students. The candidate may not transport students in his/her own vehicle or visit students or parents in non-school locations.
  • Privacy and free speech rights permit the candidate to maintain and submit information on the internet, including posting on Facebook and other similar sites; however, Teacher Candidates should take caution and consider how the information they post can be perceived by colleagues, administrators, parents, and, above all, students. When one chooses to post personal and private information on the web, s/he risks that information being used publicly. One cannot control how others judge one, but can control the information from which others make judgments. (see Digital Do’s and Don’ts section)
  • School trips outside of the school day/evening which the Teacher Candidate is asked to chaperone must be cleared by the University. Trips are reviewed on a case by case basis to determine the liability risk to the Student Teacher and University. Contact the Office of Field Experience and Clinical and/or direct the school/Cooperating Teacher to contact the Office as soon as plans are presented.
  • Work slowdown or stoppage:
    • In case of a work slowdown, the Teacher Candidate is required to function only if the Cooperating Teacher is working; otherwise the student is to return to campus. S/he should not assume any responsibilities, which are not being performed by a majority of the teachers in the building.
    • In case of a work stoppage, Teacher Candidates are declared non-participants to all parties involved in the dispute. If the stoppage is of such duration that the quality of the student teaching experience might be affected, the possibility of revising the student teaching assignment, either in length or location, remains the prerogative of the College of Education and Leadership. In the first days of the work stoppage students are to participate in various professional activities (i.e. curriculum development, reading, writing, field trips, visits to other school systems or activities recommended by the supervisor). If a strike extends beyond five days, the candidate is to report to the Office of Field Experience and Clinical for possible reassignment. Experiences will be provided in another school system on a standby basis until the stoppage ends in the assigned school.
    • Under no circumstances are Teacher Candidates to cross picket lines.
    • Teacher Candidates are to report immediately to the Office of Field Experience and Clinical the possibility of a strike as well as its actual occurrence.
    • If teachers withdraw their services, all Teacher Candidates are withdrawn from the school system and alternative experiences are assigned.

Contact with school authorities is made through the University Supervisor or the Director of Field Experience and Clinical.

Legal Status of Student Teacher or Intern Teacher (WIP) in Wisconsin

A compilation by the Association of Teacher Educators of state laws related to the legal status of Student Teachers indicated that Wisconsin has no statutes or administrative codes governing Student Teachers. It is further indicated that no plans are pending for enacting such into statutes in the State. “The position taken in the State of Wisconsin is that the Student Teacher is an arm of the teacher, for that matter the school district, and they are the responsible parties in legal matters.”

Not only must the teacher exercise ordinary care in his/her functioning, the trial court in its instructions to the jury established the following standards:

  1. The instructor has the duty to instruct and to warn pupils in his/her custody of any dangers which he/she knows, or in the exercise of ordinary care ought to know, are present in the classroom situation.
  2. The instructor has the duty to instruct the students in matters which protect them from these dangers whether the danger would arise from equipment, devices, machines or other causes. Failure to warn the students of such danger or to instruct them in means of avoiding such danger is negligence.
  3. In determining whether or not the instructor exercised ordinary care, a jury may weigh and consider the age, intelligence and experience, which he/she knew or should have known that, the students in the class possessed.
  4. A jury may weigh and consider the responsibilities which have been placed upon the instructor by his/her employment, such as the curriculum he/she is required to carry out, the daily schedules imposed upon him/her, the number of pupils assigned to his/her class, the arrangement of the classroom and the equipment, devices or other objects contained within the classroom.

As a responsible “arm” of the teacher, the Student Teacher/intern needs to be aware of these standards and is expected to discuss matters with the Cooperating Teacher and conduct his/her classes accordingly.

Association of Teacher Educators, Providing legal status for Student Teacher, Washington, D.C.: The Association, 1977.

Digital Dos and Don’ts for Social Media for all Teacher Candidates

Many current Student Teachers identify themselves as ‘digital natives,’ those who have grown up with technology and for whom a distinction between the offline and the online does not exist as clearly as it does for ‘digital immigrants.’ Laura Pearce, UK Safer Internet Centre, explains, “If you have been using these technologies since you were a child, you are less likely to think twice about what you post online.” Therefore, somewhat counter-intuitively, digital natives are especially vulnerable online “because they are not used to having limitations placed on their access to technology.”

It is exceedingly important, then, that Student Teachers use caution when using digital technology.

  • Do read the school’s / school district’s acceptable use policy on digital media and follow it.
  • Do use social media for educational purposes only in ways the school/school district allows it. Use social media in innovative ways, but be smart about how it is used and apply security settings appropriately.
  • Do choose friends and followers wisely. Differentiate real friends from professional acquaintances by using access settings, and never accept friend/follow requests from pupils or parents.
  • Don’t overshare personal information. If not prepared to say it to the principal, then do not put it on any social media site for the world to view and take screenshots.
  • Do be aware of the implications of posting opinions on social and political issues.
  • Don’t post school-related or student-teaching-related matters or pictures on social media
  • Don’t tag photos of self or students at your school. The Student Teacher should also be aware of photos s/he may be tagged in and who has access to view them. If s/he would be uncomfortable with the principal seeing it, remove the photo.
  • Read more on this issue:
    https://www.americanboard.org/blog/?p=249

Assessment of Field Experiences and Student Teaching

The teacher preparation programs in the Teacher Education division of the College of Education and Leadership use the Pathway assessment tool during all clinical/field experiences and student teaching. This assessment tool is based on Danielson’s Teacher Effectiveness Framework and provides evaluative information about the candidate’s professional growth as a teacher candidate over time.

Performance Issues and Concerns

Issues and concerns related to performance in the university classroom, field and clinical placements and any other capacity related to the program in Teacher Education may arise. Areas of concern are notated on the Student Teaching Observation form by the University Supervisor. A formative assessment/action plan will be developed by the triad team (teacher candidate, mentor/cooperating teacher, university supervisor) and notated on the Student Teaching Observation form.

The Office of Field Experience and Teacher Education Program may meet with the teacher candidate to develop a written Action Plan for success in student teaching, including detailed requirements which must be addressed and completed during the student teaching semester.

  • A collaborative Action Plan for Success in Student Teaching may be issued to a candidate for:
    1. Habitual tardiness, absences
    2. Incomplete lesson plans / lesson plans not submitted to CT/US
    3. Failure to communicate with the instructor/university supervisor as required
    4. Failure to demonstrate adequate academic progress
    5. Demonstrating competencies and dispositions that do not meet the criteria for the pre-service teacher program; and
    6. Other actions at the discretion of the instructor/University Supervisor/ Office of FE.
    Possible consequences will be specified if the action plan does not lead to the resolution of the concern. The result of the follow-up may also lead to the decision to terminate the student teaching experience.

Removal from Placement:

  • The College of Education and Leadership is committed to providing a standard of excellence in education and in the practice of the teaching profession. Therefore, it is expected that teacher candidates in class and in clinical/field experiences will be free of alcohol and other drugs, except those prescribed by a physician. Failure to comply with this standard can result in disciplinary actions. These could include dismissal from the classroom and clinical field experience, a referral to the Counseling Department and/or dismissal from the program. Evidence of consumption of alcohol or use of controlled substances on school property is grounds for removal from a student teaching placement.
  • Evidence of lack of competence as determined by the Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor will be considered grounds for removal from placement. Evidence will include Action Plans for Success in Student Teaching, Observation forms (including formative Action Plans), notes from teacher candidate and program/Office of Field Experience meetings (if applicable), and assessments of the student’s knowledge, skills and dispositions according to the Pathway evaluation.
  • Any other gross misconduct or failure to abide by the Student Teaching Guidelines will be considered grounds for removal from placement. Gross misconduct includes any pattern of disruptive or threatening behavior noted by the Cooperating Teacher, building administrator, or University Supervisor as defined by expectations of teacher licensing according to the knowledge, skills and dispositions required in the Pathway evaluation.

Appeal Process

Students who wish to contest a decision made regarding their grade or their program are to follow the procedures outlined below:

  1. Meet with the instructor or individual closest to the issue at hand and attempt to resolve concerns.
  2. If the issue is unresolved, the student may contact the chair of the Program in which they are enrolled for an appeal and/or to discuss concerns with the Program Chair in an attempt to come to resolution.
  3. If the issue remains unresolved, appeal to the Associate Dean within the College of Education and Leadership in writing, outlining the concern, steps taken to resolve the issue, and proposed solutions. An appeal must include written recommendations from the Program Chair.
  4. Should the issue remain unresolved upon review by the Associate Dean of the College of Education and Leadership the Associate Dean may refer the issue to the Dean of the College of Education and Leadership. The Dean of the College of Education and Leadership makes the final decision regarding the appeal. A letter indicating the Dean’s decision will be mailed to student.

Forms Required for Field Experience and Clinical Practice for Initial Licensure Programs

All forms required for Field Experience and Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) can be found on the Canvas page for Initial Certification.

Guidelines & Policies for Graduate Students (teachers and Educators) seeking advanced licensure, Master of Science in Leadership (MEL), Reading Teacher (316 Licensure) (17 Licensure), ESL (395 Licensure) And MS In Higher Education Student Affairs Leadership

Licensed teachers may seek advanced degrees or licensures to become principals (MEL program), Reading Teacher Licensure (316), Administrative Literacy Specialist (17), English as a Second Language (ESL, 395), and Director of Special Education and Pupil Services (80).

Program Outcome for each program, list of required courses, license and state standards for each program can be found in the catalog and also on the Canvas page for the program.

Policies and Procedures Governing Graduate programs

The graduate catalog is the resource for policies and procedures applying to all graduate programs offered at Cardinal Stritch University. The graduate catalog can be found at http://www.stritch.edu/Academics/Catalog.

Licensure Only Option

Please note that students enrolled in the MEL program who have a Master’s Degree may choose to pursue requirements for licensure only even if they have been applied and admitted to the Master’s Degree program. They may leave the program after meeting the coursework required for the licensure.

Transfer versus Waiver of Credits and Coursework

At times coursework may be accepted from students as transferred courses. Please consult the graduate catalog for transfer of credit policies http://www.stritch.edu/Academics/Catalog. There may also be cases when a course is waived as equivalency to a required course. These courses will not transfer to the transcript and are mostly accepted for licensure purposes only. If the student is seeking the degree, an additional course must be taken in lieu of the waived course. This policy applies to all graduate programs.

Master of Science in Educational Leadership (MEL) Program

The Master of Science in Educational Leadership (MEL) program leads to state of Wisconsin licensure as Principal (#51) and Director of Instruction (#10).

Standards and Program Outcomes

The 31-credit program is aligned to the seven Wisconsin Administrator Standards. See individual syllabi for the applicable MEL program standards that are each aligned to one or more of the Wisconsin Administrative Standards. Course outcomes, activities, assignments, and assessments connect to the standards and program outcomes.

Prerequisites and Program Sequence

Students begin the program with EDU 571: Introduction to Leadership. Coursework includes the leadership core courses (571, 573, 575); specific coursework in student and school-level data; instructional leadership; development, supervision and evaluation of staff; educational law and financial law (588, 576, 580, and 583); and research (606, 607, 608). The last course in the 11-course graduate program sequence is EDU 586: Analysis of Systems Leadership. This course requires completion of a portfolio that demonstrates the skills, knowledge, and dispositions attained in relationship to the MEL program outcomes. Key assessments throughout the program include the Leadership Platform (571), Organizational Challenge (575), Organizational Effectiveness Plan (576), and Portfolio (586).

Practicum

Principal and Director of Instruction certification is awarded upon successful completion of coursework and the completion of a 100-hour onsite practicum experience supervised by a university-based supervisor and site supervisor. An additional 50 hours of practicum is embedded into the program coursework.

Master’s Degree and Licensure

The 31 credits earned upon completion of MEL coursework apply toward a Master of Sciences in Educational Leadership. University policy requires that all credits applying toward a master’s degree must be completed within seven consecutive years.

To receive Principal and Director of Instruction Certification

Students must:

  • Complete required coursework with a 3.0 overall grade point average on a 4.0 scale with no individual course grade below a “B”
  • Satisfactorily pass key assessment assignments, which are embedded throughout the program as described in individual course syllabi
  • Successfully complete the practicum and submit practicum forms to Cardinal Stritch University

Program learning outcome and license and state standards can be found on the MEL Canvas page.

Applying for Licensure

Upon successfully completing all coursework and submitting the practicum forms, students are endorsed by Stritch’s Certifying Officer. Endorsement is sent directly to DPI. Students are then able to apply online for certification. Contact program advisor for details. DPI’s online licensing site is: https://dpi.wi.gov/tepdl/elo.

Culminating Experiences

The following describes the final projects and experiences that are completed by the end of the MEL program.

Pre and Post Assessment: Prior to the beginning of the first course, EDU 571, students engage in a self-assessment of their knowledge, skills and attitudes related to leadership. At the end of the program students reassess their growth over time.

Leadership Platform: This cumulative reflection and writing assignment details the student's leadership stance that is an expression about his/her leadership approach based on the WI Administrator Standards.

Practicum: Students are required to accumulate 150 hours of leadership-related experiences during the course of the program. These experiences are aligned with the WI Administrative Standards. The practicum work and experiences in the Master’s in Educational Leadership is intended to provide leadership experiences that replicate that which people assigned to Educational Leadership positions (i.e. principals, supervisors, coordinators, directors, department heads, etc.) complete in the reality of educational settings.

  • 50 hours of the practicum experiences at Cardinal Stritch University is integrated within 31 credits of coursework within the MEL program.
  • 100 hours are to be at the site or related site and coordinated with the site based supervisor and their university supervisor.
  • These experiences must be aligned with the Wisconsin Administrator Standards.
  • A minimum of one site based practicum experience must be related to diversity.

Research Requirement: Five credits have been designated for graduate level research guided by student choice. Student will provide evidence of learning aligned to standards and program outcomes.

Electronic Leadership Portfolio: Throughout your program, you will be guided toward adding to your leadership portfolio. Use the program goals to guide and organize your self-assessment. Your portfolio will be helpful as you progress through your program and look back on your successes and high level of learning.

Students collect assignments, document practicum experiences and include identified assignment(s) that represent their mastery of each of the seven Administrator Standards. For each artifact, the student writes a one to two paragraph reflection indicating how the chosen artifact exemplifies that particular standard(s).

Final Comprehensive Assessment: At the end of the program, students engage in a culminating presentation in which they address their growth in leadership by demonstrating competency in the program outcomes.

Key Assessments

This chart summarizes the course key assessments that are submitted by the student to LiveText during the program. These key assessments may be considered for inclusion in the student’s electronic portfolio as an artifact with accompanying reflection to demonstrate achievement of program outcomes and state standards.

Key Assessment Course(s) Program Outcome Alignment
Leadership Platform Paper 571: Introduction to Leadership & 586: Analysis of Systems Leadership 1, 6, 2
Organizational Challenge Paper 575: Leading Beyond Organizational Improvement 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Organizational Effectiveness Plan 576: Ldrshp. in Planning, Assessing & Facilitating Learning 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Research Strand Artifact 608: Research Strand II 1, 2, 5, 7
1) Presentation/Performance of Outcomes 2) Electronic Portfolio 571: Introduction to Leadership & 586: Analysis of Systems Leadership 1-8

Evaluation and Grading

The instructors for each course in this program will have specific expectations for the products you will produce to demonstrate your learning. Everyone is committed to your success. The evaluation of your course work has three purposes:

  1. To assess the quality and quantity of the learning that has been facilitated by the course of study
  2. To provide feedback about your growth throughout the program
  3. To help instructors determine the effectiveness of instruction in order to improve it.

The faculty at Cardinal Stritch University is committed to fair evaluation and welcomes student input. You will be provided with clear performance indicators with matching assessment tasks for each course along with the criteria the instructor will use when evaluating your products. Due to the accelerated nature of the program, it is essential that assignments be completed in a timely manner.

Throughout your program, you will be guided toward adding to your leadership portfolio. Use the program goals to guide and organize your self-assessment. Your portfolio will be helpful as you progress through your program and look back on your successes and high level of learning.

End of Program Checklist

To Do:

  • Final Electronic Leadership Portfolio that includes:
        Part I: Introduction
    • Resume (optional)
    • Personal Mission Card
    • Personal Leadership Position Paper
        Part II: Demonstration of Competencies
    • Eight (8) identified key assignments/artifacts that demonstrate all 8 MEL program outcomes and all 7 WI Administrator Standards. Each artifact must be preceded by a 1-2 paragraph reflective description, which clearly specifies the MEL Program Outcomes and WI Administrator standards being demonstrated, and states why/how it is demonstrated within the artifact.
    • Research Strand Project and rubric (EDU608/586)
    • Rubric of Performance/Presentation on MEL Outcomes
        Part III: Record of Practicum Experiences
    • Site Based Supervisor Application (Form A)
    • Practicum Site Description (Form B)
    • Site Based Practicum Experience Summary Sheets (Form C)
    • Site Based Practicum Project Evaluation Rubric (Form D)
    • University Supervisor Meeting Summaries (Form E)
    • Final Practicum Log (Form F)
  • Deliver a presentation on your research strand product.
  • Presentation/Performance demonstrating program outcomes (EDU586)
  • Apply for graduation http://www.stritch.edu/Student-Experience/Registrar/Applying-For-A-Diploma-Or-Degree. Select appropriate form for Master’s in Science Educational Leadership. If choosing to participate in the graduation ceremony, further information will be provided after submitting an application by the application deadline. Please note, you have to fill out the application, even if you do not intend to participate in the ceremony.

Site Based Practicum Examples

The practicum is to consist of educational leadership experiences that supplement and give meaning to the coursework in the Master’s program. A variety of experiences as opposed to one type of experience is required. The experiences need to be designed to align with the content of the courses so as to provide application of the knowledge, performances, and dispositions acquired in the program. It is essential that all practicum activities applied to the 100 hour requirement involve engaging others, as opposed to being an independent activity, e.g. writing a handbook. In addition, a minimum of 1 practicum activity must be connected to diversity.

DPI places a high priority on performance related activities. Therefore, closely examine the Administrator content standards for suggestions:
https://dpi.wi.gov/tepdl/programs/standards/administrator

Hours Required: 100 hours

Samples of Leadership Activities Which Qualify:

  • Activities as a teacher in charge or acting assistant principal
  • Curriculum development/writing
  • Coordinating a summer site program
  • Developing/presenting a staff development program or course
  • Involvement in administrative activities (scheduling, discipline, etc.)
  • Involvement in a leadership role in a community group related to education
  • Serving on a district committee
  • Supervising student teachers (10 hours max)
  • >Involvement on an interview team for hiring new staff
  • Facilitating a site team/committee
  • Facilitating a faculty meeting
Note: Duties/activities which are part of a usual teaching or co-curricular assignment do not count for practicum purposes. If you are not sure whether a specific activity counts, consult with the course instructor, University Supervisor, or MEL program chair.

K-12 Reading Teacher Licensure Program (316)

The Reading Teacher program leads to the state of Wisconsin K-12 316 Licensure.

Standards and Program Outcomes

The program is connected to the International Reading Association’s Standards for Reading Professionals and aligned with INTASC Teacher Standards. See individual syllabi for course-related standards that are tied to program outcomes and assessment criteria.

Prerequisites and Program Sequence

Students can enter the program at any point when the following courses are offered: RL 560, RL 561, RL 562, RL 565, and RL 570. The last course in the certification sequence is the capstone: RL 570 Practicum. 316 Reading Teacher licensure is awarded upon successful completion of coursework and requires passing the WI Foundations of Reading Test (FoRT) with a score of 240 or better.

Literacy Center Observation and Practical Application

The work of master instructors who teach struggling readers in Cardinal Stritch Literacy Centers it is a demonstration of the 316 language and literacy coursework in practice. Therefore, the final course in the 316 program will be a practicum internship in one of the Stritch Literacy Centers. In order to best prepare students for that culminating experience, approximately 5 hours of literacy center observation, data collection and reflection is required in each of the 4 prerequisite courses. These learning opportunities will be completed outside of scheduled class time. Scheduling and locations are flexible - Students will be responsible for making their own arrangements.

Pathway to Master’s Degree / 17 Reading Specialist License

All 20 credits earned upon completion of 316 coursework directly apply toward a Master of Arts Degree in Language and Literacy, which also includes a 17 Reading Specialist License. The MA block of coursework is a minimum of 10 credits. Required coursework includes HESA 550 Fundamentals of Research Methods (3 credits), RL 516 Supervision of K-12 Literacy Programs (4 credits), RL 580 Project-based Research (1 credit), and the choice of an elective course in an area of interest (must be approved by department). University policy requires that all credits applying toward a master’s degree must be completed within seven (7) consecutive years.

Teachers that have earned a 316 license as well as a master degree from another university are invited to send unofficial transcripts to the program advisor in the Language and Literacy Department for review so an individualized program can be designed. In most cases, only 2 courses are required for the 17 license.

Licensure Requirements: Wisconsin Foundations of Reading Test (FORT)

Any individual applying as of January 1st, 2014 for an initial license as a 316 Reading Teacher or 17 Reading Teacher Specialist is required to take and pass the Wisconsin Reading Foundations Test. Passing score is 240. • Wisconsin Website for the Foundations of Reading Test: http://www.wi.nesinc.com/ The website includes all the practice testing materials, registration information, and policies needed to understand the Foundations of Reading Test. *When you take the test, request that the score be set to Cardinal Stritch University.

Applying for 316 Reading Teacher / 17 Reading Specialist Licensure

Upon successful completion of all 316 and/or 17 coursework and submission of a passing score for the Foundations of Reading Test, teachers are ready to be endorsed by Stritch’s Certifying Officer. Endorsement is sent directly to DPI. Applicants are then able to apply on line for certification. Contact program advisor for details. DPI’s online licensing site is: https://dpi.wi.gov/tepdl/elo

K-12 English as a Second Language (ESL) Licensure Program

The ESL program leads to state of Wisconsin licensure in English as a Second Language (395).

The program is offered at the graduate level for practicing or licensed teacher pursuing a subsequent licensure or MAT, MAIE< and MUE teachers as an add-on licensure. The program is also offered at the undergraduate level as a minor for education majors. The minor is open to students from other programs but will not lead to the 395 licensure.

Standards and Program Outcomes

The program is aligned with the state of Wisconsin standards for ESL and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) standards.

Prerequisites and Program Sequence

All licensed teachers, MAT, MUE, or MAIE teacher candidates or licensed graduate students and undergraduate students may register for these courses with the approval from program advisors. Students must have taken at least two of the courses prior to registering in the practicum course.

Practicum

A university supervisor will observe teacher candidates and practicing teachers during practicum. Licensed teachers must have bilingual or English learners in their classroom in order to conduct their practicum in their own classroom.

Pathway to Master’s Degree

Licensed teachers may take additional coursework in the Master of Arts in Language and Literacy Program to obtain a Master’s Degree. Please contact Dr. Marian Graeven Peters in the College of Education and Leadership for more information.

Applying for 395 ESL Licensure

Upon successful completion of the coursework and endorsement by Stritch’s Certifying Officer, the candidate’s documents will be submitted to DPI for endorsement. Applicants are then able to apply online for certification. Contact program advisor for details. DPI’s online licensing site is: https://dpi.wi.gov/tepdl/elo

Master of Science in Higher Education Student Affairs Leadership Program

The Master of Science in Higher Education Student Affairs Leadership is open to individuals pursuing a degree to work in different capacities in two-year and four-year higher education institutions.

The program is comprised of 33 credits of coursework and includes a practicum, if the individual is already working in a position in higher education, or a field experience, if the individual is aspiring to pursue a position in different capacities in higher education. The practicum can be conducted in the student’s place of employment. To complete field experiences, students will be placed in a higher education setting. In both cases, the individual will be supervised by a university supervisor.

All policies governing graduate programs apply to this program. Please see the graduate catalog for detailed information. This program does not lead to any licensure.

Post Master’s Degree Licensure Programs

Students applying to two programs in the College of Education and Leadership need to have a teaching license and a Master’s Degree prior to being admitted to the program. The two programs are Director of Special Education and Pupil Services and the Superintendence Licensure.

Director of Special Education and Pupil Services (SEL) Program

The SEL program leads to state of Wisconsin licensure as Director of Pupil Services and Special Education (#80).

Standards and Program Outcomes

The 12-credit licensure program includes doctoral coursework in social justice leadership, special education law and policy, advanced educational methods for teaching a diverse student body, instructional leadership, and program administration. The program outcomes are aligned with the Wisconsin Administrator Standards, the Director of Special Education and Pupil Services Content Standards, and the Council for Exceptional Children’s Advanced Standards.

Prerequisites and Program Sequence

Students begin the program with SED 740: Leading Diverse Educational Systems. The final course requires completion of a portfolio that demonstrates the skills, knowledge, and dispositions attained in relation to the program outcomes.

Practicum

The Director of Special Education and Pupil Service certification is awarded upon successful completion of coursework and the completion of a 100-hour onsite practicum experience supervised by a university-based supervisor and site supervisor. Through coursework, fieldwork, and on-the-job mentoring with current special education administrators, students will develop the knowledge, skills, and disposition needed to serve as a Director of Special Education and Pupil Services.

To receive Director of Special Education and Pupil Services Licensure

Students must:

  • Have an approved administrative license or degree. Students who do not have an educational leadership degree from an approved university need to complete an additional 12 credits of educational leadership coursework (EDU 571, 573, and 575)
  • Have three years of successful full-time teaching experience at any of the grades at the early childhood through adolescence level, or they must have completed three years of successful experience as a school counselor, a school psychologist, or a school social worker that includes evidence of at least 540 hours of successful classroom teaching experience.
  • Complete required coursework with a “Pass” or a “High Pass” in all classes in the program.
  • Satisfactorily pass key assessment assignments, which are embedded throughout the program as described in individual course syllabi.
  • Successfully complete the practicum and submit practicum forms to Cardinal Stritch University.

Applying for Licensure

Upon successfully completing all coursework and submitting the practicum forms, students are endorsed by Stritch’s Certifying Officer. Endorsement is sent directly to DPI. Students are then able to apply online for certification. Contact program advisor for details. DPI’s online licensing site is: https://dpi.wi.gov/tepdl/elo

Superintendent Licensure (The District Administrator Licensure)

The District Administrator licensure program leads to licensure for the Superintendence license in the state of Wisconsin. The 21-credit program can be completed in 14 months and is delivered in an accelerated cohort model. Classes are offered one or two weekends per month, enabling students to pursue this licensure while simultaneously continuing their careers. The faculty is a mix of doctoral faculty and practicing and retired superintendents.

The program emphasizes effective, moral leadership from the superintendent perspective, district economics and finance, working with the school board, leading the learning organization, and a thorough understanding of the standards for teachers and administrators. Currently there are approximately over 70 superintendents in the greater Midwest that are graduates of Stritch.

Program Format

The District Administrator Licensure program is designed for working school leaders currently holding school administrator positions. The cohort model provides a diverse forum for discussion and a rich, ongoing professional environment for learning. This program offers students enrichment and practicum opportunities in addition to class meetings. Students are a part of a study team which meets between class sessions to provide additional study and preparation time and to extend the professional conversation.

A practicum of several months provides each student with superintendent experiences under the guidance and supervision of a practicing superintendent and a Cardinal Stritch University supervisor. The practicum provides the full range of experiences so the student is familiar with the superintendent role in all of its leadership aspects. The DPI Administrator Standards serve as a guide for the practicum.

Most program faculty are practitioners as well as expert instructors.

Course Delivery

  • Face-to-face but with ample on-line resources and regular communication with the faculty and other students.

Starting the Program

A new cohort begins each September with classes held on the Main Campus in Fox Point.

Course timing and sequence

Fall Semester

  • ED 714 Leadership Development Seminar, 4 credits *
  • ED 771 Leadership Seminar I, 1 credit

Spring Semester

  • ED 760 The Superintendency, 3 credits
  • ED 774 Leadership Perspective: Nature and Nurture of Learning, 2 credits *

Summer Semester

  • ED 770 School District Finance, 3 credits
  • ED 776 Leadership in Planning & Assessing Learning, 2 credits *

Fall Semester

  • ED 710 Leadership Theory: Evolution and Influences, 4 credits *
  • ED 772 Leadership Seminar II, 2 credits

The link below will take you to the Course Description page on the Stritch website:
http://www.stritch.edu/Courses?program=208

Connections to the Doctoral Program

All 21 credits earned in the District Administrator Licensure program transfer into our Doctorate in Leadership programs, so graduates can earn a third of an Ed.D. or Ph.D. while working toward their District Administrator License.

Students who complete the District Administrator Licensure program and who aspire to a doctoral degree, may transfer the 700-level credits into the Doctoral Program at Cardinal Stritch University, providing an efficient, dual use of the coursework. Note: Licensure Program students need to apply separately to the Doctoral Program and go through the selective admission process.

  • The 12 credits above marked with an * are the same as the Doctoral course content
    The other 9 credits may be used as electives to complete Doctoral credit requirements

Doctoral students who want to achieve the District Administrator license need to complete ED 760, The Superintendency, ED 770, Economics and Finance, and the Practicum experience to be eligible for the license.

Grading

The District Administrator Licensure program uses the same grading assessments as the doctoral program. Students are assessed High Pass/Pass/Incomplete/Fail. For transcript purposes and translation to traditional grading scales, High Pass is equivalent to an A, Pass is equivalent to a B and Fail is equivalent to an F. The program uses rubrics based on course and program outcomes as assessment guides.

Financial Aid

At the graduate level, the amount of funding you require is based on the number of credits in which you enroll and the tuition for your program. We welcome you to discuss financing your education with either your admissions counselor or a financial aid counselor in the Office of Financial Aid.

Stritch participates in the Direct Loan program which provides funds to both graduate and professional degree students. Eligible students can take advantage of either a Direct Unsubsidized Loan or a PLUS Loan. Federal student loans offer many benefits not typically included with private loans, such as fixed interest rates and income-based repayment plans. Most student loans do not require repayment until after graduation.

Graduate Scholarships and Tuition Discounts

Educators and administrators from the counties listed below are eligible for a 20% savings from our published tuition. This offer is available to new, full-time students who begin select degree programs in the College of Education and Leadership.

Milwaukee, Waukesha, Washington, Racine, Kenosha, Ozaukee, Sheboygan, Walworth, Rock, Dane

A 50% discount on tuition is available to full time or part-time teachers and administrators at Catholic primary or secondary schools in Wisconsin.

The Practicum

The superintendent practicum is a 6-7 month process begun typically midway through the spring semester where the student works with her/his superintendent to gain experience in those many roles and leadership experiences that are often the sole responsibilities of the superintendent. A Stritch supervisor is a collaborator to ensure the student gains an optimal experience, tailored to the needs of the student to complement her/his background and aspirations. The Practicum is intended to encourage interaction with all stakeholders of the school community including teachers, support staff, students, administrators, school board, community organizations, social service organizations and any other relevant parties to a particular school setting. A Practicum Guide provides details on the Practicum and includes background, expectations, forms, rubrics and standards to be met.

Certification Information

All students who successfully complete the program are eligible for the five-year professional district administrator license.

District administrator students who have an immediate need for a license are eligible for a provisional –one-year renewable-- district administrator license at the start of the program. A letter from the hiring school board and a letter from a Stritch program official are required to support the Provisional license request.

Note that a prerequisite for a superintendent license is administrative licensure as a principal.

Transfer Credits

Due to the unique nature of the Stritch Superintendent Licensure Program, it is expected that all studies will be completed at Cardinal Stritch University. The transfer of credits is limited. However, students may have earned relevant and recent credits from another accredited licensure program that may be eligible for transfer. Subject matter must be directly relevant and applicable to Stritch’s Programs as determined by the Stritch program coordinator. The courses must have been taken within the five years and have a grade of B or better.

Absence from Class

If a student must be absent for any portion of a course, the student must: a) notify the instructor in advance; b) complete all the assignments due for the course missed; and c) verify with the instructor any additional work or study team obligations needed to make up missed work.

If a student is absent for more than 25% of the course, she/he must immediately withdraw, or receive an unsatisfactory grade for the course.

All original course assignments and additional assignments described above should be completed within the course time limits. Work that is submitted after the course has been completed is subject to the policies and procedures relating to Incompletes or failure.

Students who make arrangements for, and satisfactorily complete makeup work for any part of the seminar missed, will not be penalized for the absence(s).

Course Drop Policy

Students who wish to drop a course must officially notify the University of their intent to drop the course at least one day prior to the beginning of the seminar. Students must notify their advisor by mail or phone--subsequently confirmed in writing.

Practicum Guidelines for Students

The superintendent practicum is intended to encourage interaction with all stakeholders of the school community including teachers, non-certified staff, students, administrators, school board, support staff, community organizations, social service organizations and any other relevant parties to a particular school setting.

The practicum requires a variety of leadership roles that are needed in order to gain experiences in each of the 7 WI Administrative Standards.

Each student is required to keep a portfolio of practicum experiences for submission in his/her leadership portfolio. Each practicum experience is to be logged on the practicum entry record. Each practicum experience must connect to a Wisconsin Administrator Standard and be assessed by the school based supervisor. All Wisconsin Administrator Standards must be addressed. The log will summarize the 50+ hours spent in practicum experiences.

In your Leadership Portfolio you will complete for each school based practicum experience:

  1. The school based practicum experience cover sheet.
  2. A 1-2 page reflection summarizing your experiences and how they helped you gain competence in the WI Administrative Standards
  3. The school based supervisor signed assessment rubric for each experience
  4. The signatures of the school based supervisor and university supervisor

Submission of the Practicum Entry Forms and Log

After completing each practicum experience, submit the cover sheet, the school based supervisor’s completed rubric, and a 1-2 page reflection to the University Supervisor. The University Supervisor, reviews the document and forwards it to the Program Coordinator.

School Based Practicum Guidelines and Examples

The practicum is to consist of educational leadership (superintendent-like) experiences that supplement and give meaning to the coursework in the Superintendent Licensure program. A variety of experiences as opposed to one type of experience is to be sought after with the experiences designed to align or connect with the content of the courses so as to provide application of the knowledge, performances, and dispositions acquired in the program.

Hours Required: 50 hours
Samples of Leadership Activities Which Qualify:

Shadowing the superintendent Chairing a school committee
Curriculum development/writing Leading district curriculum/staff development team
Leading administrative meetings Presenting at workshops/conferences with administration or leadership themes
Directing summer school Leading interview team for a district-level role
Presenting at School Board meetings Direct involvement in developing and managing the district budget
Involvement in a leadership role in a community group related to district work, events, projects, planning, etc. Key role in strategic planning

Note: Duties/activities which are part of a usual building leadership role or are part of the student’s typical duties/assignment do not count for practicum purposes.

Doctoral Programs Guidelines & Policies

The College of Education and Leadership offers four doctoral programs leading to Ph.D. or Ed. D. degrees.

The four programs are:

  1. Leadership for the Advancement of Learning and Service
  2. Leadership for the Advancement of Learning and Service for Higher Education
  3. Doctorate in Language and Literacy
  4. Doctorate in Special Education

I. Purpose of the Doctoral Programs

The Doctoral programs at Cardinal Stritch University, College of Education and Leadership are logical extensions of Stritch’s commitment to live and promote the Franciscan Values of peacemaking, community, caring, and hospitality. The Doctoral Programs take these values one step further, to embrace the spirit of a dream St. Francis had in which God directed him to “Rebuild my church.” More specifically, the program involves the Stritch community to empower men and women with leadership skill, cutting-edge knowledge, and opportunities for responsible social reconstruction within local, regional, and global communities.

Learning Concepts and Guidelines

Six characteristics distinguish the program from "traditional" education:

  1. Acceleration: The accelerated pace of the program places much of the learning responsibility with the student. Students are expected to spend considerable quality time each week preparing for each Doctoral course.
  2. Cohort Learning: The faculty in the Doctoral Program believe that students learn as much from shared experiences with other students as they do from textbooks, lectures, multi-media, technology, etc. Cohort colleagues are an important component of the Doctoral Programs. Students seek opportunities both to learn from colleagues and to help one another learn.
  3. Facilitation: The role of the instructor is to guide and stimulate the class. Because the Doctoral Program promotes cohort learning, some courses will have limited formal lecturing. Students are expected to be actively involved in the learning environment.
  4. Variety of Instructional Formats: Teaching strategies in the Doctoral Programs include, but are not limited to; seminars, small groups, experiential learning, research, simulation, presentations, case studies, and integrative papers.
  5. Adult Learning: The faculty of the Doctoral Programs believes that adult students are capable of being responsible for their own education. The role of the staff and instructors is to facilitate students' learning experiences. Students are responsible for assimilating the information and competencies. The Doctoral Programs provide appropriate and challenging learning opportunities and the students must decide how these opportunities will be used.
  6. Real-world experience, service, and reflection: These three components provide a unique view of education. The theoretical structures are combined with practical experiences, which are typically related to the service component of the program. Of course, the goals could not be accomplished without reflection and analysis.

Student Population

The Doctoral Programs are designed for professionals with present or emerging leadership responsibilities in a variety of learning communities including education, business and industry, health care institutions, social services, philanthropy, libraries and museums, armed forces, government agencies, vocational education, staff training programs, consulting organizations, international agencies, educational media and unions as well as K-12 public, private, and parochial schools. Doctoral programs in Literacy and Special education are more specific to individuals with specializations as reading specialists or special education teachers or directors. The Doctorate in Leadership for the Advancement of Learning and Service in Higher Education is designed for leaders, and potential leaders, in higher education, e.g., faculty, administrators and so forth. These professionals share common interests in leadership and may use their own work sites as a focus of their studies and research. In essence, the programs are designed to facilitate the development of practical and effective leaders for broader communities. Students may undertake the program without having to relinquish full-time employment or change their residence.

The Role of the Adult Learner in the Programs

The Doctoral Leadership Dept. has high expectations of what adult students can, and will, accomplish outside of class. Because class time is limited, many topics covered in reading and work will not be directly dealt with in the seminars. This does not mean the material is unimportant. Students must spend the time required outside the seminars to learn and analyze the material, skills, and competencies, not to just complete the assignments. This work involves reading, preparing written assignments and presentations, many of which will involve technology. In most courses, group projects require meeting with other group members outside of class to prepare for in-class presentations. For this reason, courses are designed to take advantage of the adult learner's ability to be a responsible party in the learning process.

Students in the Doctoral Programs will find that they are participating heavily in class discussions, group projects, oral presentations, etc. They will find that lecturing by the instructor will occur much less often than in more traditional classrooms. The Doctoral Programs emphasize activities in which theory and other kinds of "book knowledge" are applied to real-world leadership, learning and service situations, capitalizing on the experience in the topic area. Students are encouraged -- and sometimes required -- to share their experiences and to critique theory against the real world.

II. General Policies and Guidelines

Policies governing graduate students at Cardinal Stritch University may be found in the graduate catalog at http://www.stritch.edu/Academics/Catalog.

Attendance

Attendance at all seminars is mandatory. Because of the accelerated nature of the Doctoral Programs, students are expected to attend all scheduled weekend seminars.

Promptness: Prompt arrival at each seminar is mandatory because of the limited time available to conduct in-class activities during the course. Instructors may take actions they deem appropriate if consistent tardiness is observed.

Absences: If a student is absent for more than 25% of the seminar, she/he must immediately withdraw. If withdrawn after the date student will receive an unsatisfactory grade for the course. All original course assignments and additional assignments described above should be completed within the course time limits. Work that is submitted after the course has been completed is subject to the policies and procedures relating to Incompletes or failure. Students who make arrangements for, and satisfactorily complete makeup work for any part of the seminar missed, will not be penalized for the absence(s).

Cohort Policies and Late Entrance

Students may not join a cohort group after the start of the first course in any program, with the exception of extraordinary circumstances as decided by the Chair of the Doctoral Leadership Department.

Evaluating Students Who Delay Starting Their Program

After students have been admitted to the University, permission to enroll in the Doctoral Programs will be in effect for two years. During that time period, students may enroll without submitting new transcripts or admission materials to the University, unless they have attempted additional course work for credit at another institution. Students are responsible for notifying the University regarding any additional college/university course work attempted since the original application. If additional course work has been attempted, the transcripts will be re-evaluated for admission into Stritch.

Registration

Students must register for all courses prior to the start of any semester. At this time, students are registered for classes through their graduate academic advisor. However, the university is moving toward self-registration in the near future. Students will receive information regarding self-registration from the graduate admission and will receive support from their program advisors if needed.

Course Drop Policy

Students who wish to drop a course must officially notify the University of their intent to drop the course at least one day prior to the beginning of the seminar. Students must notify their advisor by email.

If a student drops from two consecutive courses without giving notice, the student will be withdrawn from the Doctoral Programs and the Financial Aid Office will be notified. Please refer to the current University Graduate Catalog at http://www.stritch.edu/Academics/Catalog for policy/procedure information

Course Withdrawal Policy

Students desiring to withdraw from a course must notify the University of their intentions. Due to the accelerated format of the doctoral programs and coursework, Doctoral students will not be allowed to withdraw if they have attended one-day of the course. After attending one day of a Ph.D. course, students will be billed for the entire course.

Students should immediately contact their academic advisor to complete the proper paperwork as well as notifying the instructor that they have withdrawn. Student will receive a "W" grade for that course.

Students who attend any portion of a course are responsible for the full tuition for the course, even if they subsequently withdraw with either a W or a WU grade.

If students are receiving financial aid, they are expected to maintain continuous enrollment. If students withdraw from any doctoral course and it results in their being out of classes for 60 days or more, the University must notify the Financial Aid Office which will notify the lender that they are no longer "active" students.

Withdrawal from Entire Program/Re-Entry Options

If a student takes a “leave” from a doctoral program, he or she has two options, either continuous enrollment or withdrawal:

  1. Continuous enrollment, for a credit fee of one credit (ED761) per semester, insures ongoing advising services, access to the Stritch library, Internet resources, and personalized contact.
  2. Withdrawal requires re-application and re-admission procedures to continue the program at a later date in accordance with the general policies of the University. See Graduate Catalog http://www.stritch.edu/Academics/Catalog for specific information regarding re-entry.

Re-entry in the Doctoral Programs

Students who have been out of classes for less than six months may be readmitted upon receipt of a written request. The student and Chair of the Doctoral Dept. will jointly determine the appropriate time for joining a new cohort group.

Students who have been out of classes for more than six months and who have courses other than the dissertation to complete are required to complete a re-entry application/form and must submit transcripts of any courses taken since leaving the University. All re-entry students will be required to meet the University degree requirements and Doctoral Programs requirements in effect at the time of re-entry and to pay current tuition rates, as well as be accepted by the Admissions Committee of the Doctoral Dept. This policy includes students not completing the requirements of ED761.

Re-evaluation of Credits upon Re-entry

All students who have been away from Cardinal Stritch University for more than six months (have not been enrolled in Stritch courses) but less than seven years, will be required to be re-evaluated with respect to completion of the major course requirements current at the time of their re-entry.

Duplication of Courses

Cardinal Stritch University will not allow a student to receive credit for two courses that are judged to be substantially the same in content. If a student's transcript lists a course that duplicates a doctoral course, the student is responsible for having learned ALL the information covered in such a course. This means that:

  1. The student is fully prepared to take any course for which the duplicate course is a prerequisite.
  2. The student will be able to use the material in the transcripted course to aid in execution of the dissertation that the student is required to complete.
  3. Student must meet all residency requirements for their doctoral program.
  4. Student may, if he or she wishes, formally request permission to take a doctoral course that duplicates a transcripted course. This may happen when students need a particular doctoral course for residency credit or want to retake a course to improve their knowledge of the content.

Retaking Courses

It is the policy of the Doctoral Programs that if students do not successfully pass any course, they must re-take the course and pay for tuition. Typically, students enrolled in Ph.D. courses after completion of the Ed.D. coursework are not considered full time.

Classification of Students

CLASSIFICATION Full-time traditional graduate students are those enrolled for a minimum of 7.0 credits per regular semester, or 3.5 credits during summer session. Half-time traditional graduate students are those enrolled for at least 3.5, but less than 7.0 credits per regular semester, or at least 1.75 but less than 3.5 credits during the summer session. All other traditional graduate students are considered to be enrolled less than half time.

Directed Studies

Requests for Directed Study are evaluated on an individual basis by the Chair of the Doctoral Program. Directed studies are RARELY granted in the Language & Literacy/Special Ed. Doctoral programs. Some examples of when a Directed Study may be requested:

  1. A student needs to meet degree requirements but, because of location, is unable to take a course in a timely fashion and an appropriate substitute course is not available from another nearby University; or
  2. A student has completed all but a few of the major courses (or certification) and is offered a job advancement or job change opportunity which is contingent on completing the degree by a specified time and there is no possibility of doubling up with another doctoral group to complete the remaining courses in the required time period.
  3. If a student misses a course and needs to stay with his/her group and no other course is readily available, the Chair of the Doctoral Program may grant permission.

All requests for Directed Studies must be reviewed and signed by the Chair of the Doctoral Program and forwarded to the Dean for approval. The request will then be sent to the Vice President for Academic Affairs for final approval. Directed study classes may be completed via electronic communication.

Incomplete Grades

An Incomplete (I) may be granted if, through extraordinary circumstances, a student is prevented from completing course requirements. The instructor is not required to grant a student an Incomplete and will do so only at the explicit request of the student. If a student finds it necessary to request an Incomplete in a course, arrangements must be made prior to the end of the course. No instructor may grant an Incomplete unless the student initiates the request.

An Incomplete Course Contract must be completed and signed by the student, and the instructor, and submitted prior to the end of the class. The Incomplete Course Contract will specify the time limit to complete all work, the assignments that need to be completed, and a default grade if the work is not completed. An Incomplete is not to be granted in place of unsatisfactory work. An Incomplete not removed or completed by the designated date will automatically revert to the default grade assigned by the instructor on the Incomplete Course Contract.

Students may receive only a one semester extension for an Incomplete. After this time, the grade automatically reverts to the default. When a student in the Doctoral Programs receives an Incomplete, the student's transcripts and records are reviewed for advising purposes.

If the student does not complete the required work within the deadline the student is sent a letter placing the student on probation. When a student in the Doctoral Programs receives a second Incomplete without having satisfactorily removed the first within the allowed one semester period, the student is prohibited from taking any new courses without satisfactorily removing at least one of the Incompletes.

Veterans Benefits

Students qualifying for Veterans’ Benefits should contact the Financial Aid office for information regarding certification of the location where the courses are being offered. The Doctoral programs are certified to receive veteran’s benefits. Please refer to the current University Graduate Catalog at http://www.stritch.edu/Academics/Catalog for policy/procedure information.

III. Specific Program Policies and Guidelines Related to Doctoral Degrees

Study Teams

The foundation of the educational philosophy and practices of the Doctoral Programs lies in the recognition of the distinction between the younger University student and the student who has assumed the adult responsibilities of self-determination, financial independence, and professional development. With this distinction in mind, the Doctoral Programs focus on two critical learning objectives.

The first is shared participant responsibility for self-directed learning. Professional and personal growth requires that individuals develop the skills necessary to manage their own learning. Throughout the Doctoral Programs, participants are expected to seek answers to their questions, identify and develop resources to meet their concerns, and take charge of their own learning. For this reason, the program is designed to provide the structure and support necessary to encourage independence and self-direction.

The second learning objective is to develop the interpersonal skills necessary for effective participation in groups. Study Teams are an integral part of the model of the Doctoral Programs. The groups meet regularly outside of the seminars. Study Teams function as mutual support mechanisms through which students can learn more efficient problem-solving techniques from the professional expertise of peers. Students learn from one another through participation in the process of inquiry and involvement with the Study Team. When students accept the fact that they can learn from one another, a system of trust and support evolves, and the learning process becomes interactive.

Through combining and sharing the talents, experience and learning resources of the Study Team, adult students assume greater self-direction and responsibility for their learning. By sharing the learning responsibilities, more information can be disseminated among the group members within a limited amount of time. Thus, more content is covered than could be achieved through individual effort. Study Team members make the commitment to work together both in, and outside of class, and assist each other in meeting the objectives and outcomes of the course through a shared learning environment.

The curricula of the Doctoral Programs are designed to focus on participative learning outcomes. Through the Study Teams process, learning is enhanced because students are given the opportunity to analyze their experiences and to compare and contrast these experiences with theories presented in curriculum materials.

In traditional educational models, the role of the student is often relatively passive. The model of the doctoral leadership demands active participation by students in the educational process, placing substantial responsibility on the learner. Cardinal Stritch University believes that the dynamic process of group activity maximizes students' understanding and involvement in their programs and best serves their educational needs.

Study Team Requirement

In order to comply with the U.S. Department of Education requirements regarding the number of contact hours to be provided, students are required to participate in additional Study Team activities. Students must complete a Study Team log on a monthly basis. Students in the Doctoral Leadership program must complete at least 108 study team hours as part of the program. Students in the Literacy or Special Education Doctoral programs must complete 40 hours each year of the program. The Study Team logs must be signed by faculty and are a graduation requirement.

Using Doctoral Students as Subjects of Research

All students in the Doctoral Leadership Dept. at Cardinal Stritch University must conduct research as part of their studies; however, using doctoral students as subjects of any research is prohibited. Also the use of Cardinal Stritch University as the subject of research requires the approval of the Chair, Dean, or Vice President of Academic Affairs. In addition to abiding by the rules of IRB, students and faculty must also abide by the government regulations of the Federal Education Responsibility and Policy Act (FERPA) and the general ethics of research. Students in the Doctoral Leadership Dept. are in class to study and need to know that they are protected from outside forces and pressures. Consequently, students in the Doctoral Programs may not be the subject of any formal research for any doctoral student, faculty, or outside researchers, except for Stritch representatives collecting assessment data for government regulations and all accreditation agencies. Formal research is defined as any study designed to be published or to be shared with an audience other than the researcher and course faculty member.

Doctoral students may not be the subject or topic (e.g., sample or population), of any research because they are a unique and biased group that needs to be protected from being inundated with numerous surveys, studies, forms and so forth, and being pressured to complete research for fear of repercussions. The Doctoral Programs may not be the subject of any research of students. FERPA regulations are very strict on the use and sharing of student information and data. Moreover, class time needs to be dedicated to learning; however, if the proposed research is part of a class and approved by the faculty, it may be conducted. Doctoral students may use fellow doctoral students to assist with research projects in order to discuss research topics, receive feedback, be part of a class project or pilot study, but may not be used for formal research. Any methodology and/or design, e.g., survey, must be approved by faculty in the Cardinal Stritch University Doctoral Leadership Dept. and the IRB at the University. However, doctoral students may be part of a broader sample and used within the research process. For example, if a doctoral student is a superintendent in Wisconsin and a Stritch doctoral student is sending out surveys to state superintendents, this particular doctoral student may be included, but contact data may not be received from Cardinal Stritch University. Any survey distributed to doctoral students by faculty or other students needs to be have responses kept confidential (anonymous) and voluntary.

Doctoral Dissertation Committee Rules

  1. The Chairperson of the dissertation committee must be a full-time faculty or staff member at Cardinal Stritch University, possess a doctorate, and have advising experience.
  2. The dissertation committee must have at least three members, but should not have more than five members.
  3. All members of the doctoral committee must have doctorates. The only exception is that if a person has a particular area of expertise that is unique, then (s)he may serve on the dissertation committee. However, there may not be any more than one individual on the committee that does not have a doctorate. If one committee member does not have a terminal degree, the committee must have at least four members.
  4. The Chair of the Doctoral Dept. must approve the membership of all dissertation committees, including the selection of advisors, as well as any changes to the composition of all committees.
    Specific to Leadership Doctoral Programs only:
  5. A maximum of only two Stritch doctoral faculty members may be on the same dissertation committee.
  6. The doctoral mentor may be a member of the dissertation committee, but this is not a requirement. Doctoral faculty do not serve as doctoral mentors.

Extension for Submission of Dissertation—ED761/EDL761 (Continuous Enrollment)

If students are not finished with their dissertations upon completion of the course work, they must enroll in a 0-credit course (but charged for 1 credit) for each term (Summer, Fall, and Spring) to remain a current student at Stritch, without exception. The course does not count for enrollment status. If students are not registered for ED761/EDL761 every semester, they will be dropped from the program and will need to apply for re-admission. In addition, they will not have access to services provided by the University, e.g., advising, library, and so forth.

Specific to Leadership Doctoral Programs Only:

Enrollment can be in ED761: Continuing Research or any available Ph.D. course.

Time Limitation

The maximum time limit for completing the program, including the dissertation, is seven years. If needed, students may enroll in additional semesters to complete and defend their dissertation. Students continuing their dissertation scholarship beyond the prescribed three-year program will enroll in one continuous enrollment credit per semester until they reach the seven-year limit. After seven years the student must apply to the Graduate Standards Committee for an extension; however, only under special circumstances.

Doctoral Degree Completion Requirements

A student is a candidate for the doctoral degree when:

  1. All Cardinal Stritch University course work is successfully completed.
  2. Signed mentoring forms for three years are submitted.
  3. Study team logs for three years are submitted (minimum of 108 hours).
  4. All three yearly assessments of the curriculum strands are successfully completed.
  5. Institutional Review Board documentation is signed and approved.
  6. Protecting Human Subjects tutorial is completed (with certificate)
  7. Defense is successfully conducted.
  8. Dissertation is bound and the signature page is signed/approved.
  9. An electronic copy of the dissertation is submitted with copyright payment.
  10. Survey of Earned Doctorates completed (Ph.D. candidates only).
  11. The Application for Diploma is signed and submitted to the Registrar’s office, by the application deadline, even if not intending to participate in the commencement ceremony. http://www.stritch.edu/Student-Experience/Registrar/Applying-For-A-Diploma-Or-Degree

Specific to Leadership Doctoral Programs:

The Dissertation Tracking Form is a graduation requirement and must be signed and completed—all sections.

Specific to Language & Literacy/Special Education Doctoral Programs:

Graduation Checklist is completed and sent to Program Advisor.

IV. Doctorate Programs: Learning Outcomes

For learning outcome specific to each program please refer to the Canvas page for the program.

V. Types of Degrees

Leadership Doctoral Programs

The Doctoral Programs in Leadership have two degree tracks: an Ed.D. and a Ph.D. The Ed.D. involves a minimum of 63 credits, including three summer institutes, fall, and winter seminars, practica, and a dissertation. The learning outcomes of the program integrate four curriculum strands of leadership, learning, service, and research. The Ph.D. involves the same courses required in the Ed.D. plus three additional credits in the area of research; statistics (EdP850) is a required course.

Ph.D. Ed.D.
Theoretical foundations of the field Development of specialized practitioner skills
Application of other foundational or related disciplines Application of other foundations and techniques to the field
Application of other foundations and techniques to the field Applied research which primarily addresses localized practitioner problems or questions

Language and Literacy / Special Education Doctoral Programs

Doctorates in Literacy and Special Education lead to a Ph.D. degree.

VI. Dissertation Administration Checklist for Doctoral Programs - Leadership Doctoral Programs

Orientation and Learning

  1. Meet with your faculty advisor Dissertation chair to discuss your areas of interest. The Dissertation chair/advisor will be assigned by the fall of your first year.
  2. Meet with other qualified individuals who might later serve as members of your committee.
  3. Select a mentor and establish goals each semester. Utilize your mentor for coursework and possibly your dissertation.
  4. Complete your first year pilot study (sometimes referred to as the research idea paper) in ED740/741 (your first year research courses).
  5. Select final members of the committee (complete the Dissertation Committee Form).

    Proposal
  6. Select your committee (complete the Dissertation Committee Form).
  7. Submit rough drafts of your proposal (generally Chapters 1, 2, and 3 of your dissertation) to your Dissertation Chair (and to members of your committee as appropriate). For an article dissertation, or a book dissertation, the proposal should consist of the same information contained in Chapters 1, 2, and 3, but may be in a different format. For example, the material may be written as an introduction, an article, and then an outline of the entire dissertation or book.
  8. Your Dissertation Chair will provide guidance in the development of your proposal, and will advise you as to when your proposal is ready for committee consideration. Refer to the Dissertation Manual for a sample outline.
  9. Submit the proposal to your committee members and Dissertation Chair. Complete Part A of the Dissertation Tracking Form. A meeting of your committee will be held to discuss your proposal.
  10. Upon approval, submit the signed tracking form and a copy of the proposal to the program coordinator. This is a graduation requirement.

    Dissertation
  11. You and your Dissertation Chair will summarize changes the committee is recommending. With your Dissertation Chair’s and committee’s approval (and signing of the Dissertation Tracking Form), you may continue the research process. Throughout this process your dissertation committee will provide feedback via the dissertation rubric, which is a document indicating the main components and quality standards of the dissertation.
  12. Complete the University Institutional Review Board (IRB) documentation, in addition to completing the federally mandated Protecting Human Research Subjects tutorial. You must complete all University Institutional Review Board documentation and the Protecting Human Research Subjects tutorial in order to receive signed approval from the IRB before collecting data. Submit the signed IRB Form, the certificate from the Protecting Human Research Subjects tutorial, and the Dissertation Tracking Form to the program coordinator. This is a graduation requirement.
  13. Collect data and continue to consult with your Dissertation Chair and committee members as appropriate and necessary.
  14. After collecting data you must meet with your Dissertation Chair to discuss the analysis of your data. Your Dissertation Chair, and ultimately your committee members, must sign Part B of the Dissertation Tracking Form to approve your plan for analyzing data. This is a graduation requirement.
  15. Your Dissertation Chair will provide guidance in the development of your dissertation, and will advise you as to when your dissertation is ready for committee consideration.
  16. The dissertation must be approved by the full committee prior to setting defense date.

    Defense
  17. Schedule a dissertation Final Oral Defense with your Dissertation Chair and your committee members. (See timeline below.) Your Final Oral Defense can be held at Cardinal Stritch University, or an alternate site that is agreed upon by all committee members. At least four weeks prior to the Final Oral Defense you must:
    1. Receive approval of the dissertation from all committee members.
    2. Distribute full copies of your dissertation to your Dissertation Chair and all committee members.
    3. Complete and give to your Dissertation Chair a one-page, single-spaced abstract of your study that will be posted one-month prior to your defense.


    Following your Oral Defense
  18. Following your successful final oral defense:
    1. Submit your fully signed Dissertation Tracking Form to the doctoral department program coordinator. This is a graduation requirement.
    2. Plan a public presentation of your research. Your Dissertation Chair can help you find an appropriate audience.
    3. Complete any edits your Dissertation Chair and committee recommend.
    4. Submit copy of the edited version of your dissertation to the program coordinator. Department Chair and Dean of the College of Education and Leadership approval will be obtained.
  19. Following the final approval of the Chair and the Dean:
    1. Bind the final copy of your dissertation per Cardinal Stritch University library requirements. This may be done through the library, or an independently owned company, approved by the Chair of Doctoral Leadership Department. Additional fees are required for this process, which must be paid by the date of graduation.
    2. Submit a copy of your dissertation to the CSU library per requirements.
    3. Submit a copy of your dissertation, to be copyrighted through ProQuest. You may also order additional bound copies through UMI/ProQuest.
    4. Ph.D. candidates will complete the Survey of Earned Doctorates electronically. These are all graduation requirements


    Graduation
  20. As you are scheduling a Final Oral Defense you should also apply for graduation. Complete the Application for Diploma by the applicable due date (March 1 for May graduation, August 15 for August graduation, and October 1 for December graduation). Further information will be provided after the application deadline. Please refer to the current University Graduate Catalog (http://www.stritch.edu/Academics/catalog) for policy/procedure information. The application can be found here: http://www.stritch.edu/Student-Experience/Registrar/Applying-For-A-Diploma-Or-Degree
The dissertation must be submitted to the Library prior to the graduation date.
After the graduation you are officially a “Doctor”. After a successful oral defense you are “unofficially” a Doctor. Transform the world and you are truly a “Doctor”.

If a student does not pass the oral defense, (s)he must wait one year in order to defend again. If the student does not pass on the second attempt at the oral defense, the student will be academically dismissed from the Doctoral Program.

VI. Dissertation Administration Checklist for Doctoral Programs - Language & Literacy / Special Education Doctoral Programs

Orientation and Learning

  1. Throughout this program, explore your topic and discuss your area of interest with faculty. Connect course content to a possible dissertation topic. Continually ask yourself: “What do I want to discover?”
  2. Request a copy of Faculty Areas of Research Expertise which provides the names of doctoral faculty currently able to serve as chairs and dissertation committee members. Consider several faculty members and have a conversation with them to determine the best partnership.
  3. In consultation with the Program Chair, select your Dissertation Chair in later fall before spring start of EDL 752.
  4. Following completion of EDL 754 (usually summer semester of third year), select your committee.
  5. Complete the Dissertation Committee Form and submit to your program advisor

    Proposal
  6. During spring of year 3 (EDL 752), you will explore your intended dissertation topic. In consultation with your dissertation chair, you will develop a reading list and organize your thinking by creating a research review graphic organizer. At the end of this inquiry process, you will discuss your thoughts with faculty during a constructive, dialogic presentation.
  7. During summer of year 3 (EDL 754), you will complete your research review. Chapter 2 will be due. You may be granted an extension for one additional semester upon approval of your Dissertation Committee Chair. Contact your Program Advisor who will assist you in filing Incomplete Paperwork with the Registrar.
  8. Following Chapter 2 approval, you will then complete Chapter 1 and Chapter 3 in whatever order you and your dissertation chair decide. Chapter 3 must be approved by the entire committee. When Chapter 3 revisions are approved by your chair, you may proceed to Institutional Review Board proposal submission.

    Dissertation
  9. Complete the University Institutional Review Board (IRB) documentation, in addition to completing the federally mandated Protecting Human Research Subjects tutorial. You must complete all University Institutional Review Board documentation and the Protecting Human Research Subjects tutorial in order to receive signed approval from the IRB before collecting data. Submit the signed IRB Form and the certificate from the Protecting Human Research Subjects tutorial to the program coordinator.
  10. Collect data and continue to consult with your Dissertation Chair and committee members as appropriate and necessary. After collecting data you must meet with your Dissertation Chair to discuss the analysis of your data. Your Dissertation Chair, and ultimately your committee members, must approve your plan for analyzing data.

    Defense
  11. When your dissertation is approved by all committee members and revisions have been approved by your dissertation chair, your dissertation chair will send an email to your program advisor. Once this email is received, your program advisor will provide information and support regarding your defense and next steps to graduation.
  12. You are now able to schedule your defense date. Contact your committee and arrange a defense date and time. Have a first and second choice. Send this information to your program advisor who will invite faculty to attend your defense. A copy of your abstract must be sent to your program advisor at this time as well.
  13. You may invite others to your defense. If you choose an open defense, attendees will need to step out following your presentation while faculty deliberate and then provide you with feedback. Due to contracts with Stritch Food Service, you may not provide refreshments during your defense. Your oral defense must be held at Cardinal Stritch University.

    Following your Oral Defense
  14. Upon successful defense, committee members will sign your Dissertation Approval page. It will be collected by your program advisor who will obtain the signature of the Dean of the College of Education and Leadership.
  15. Complete any final edits your committee has recommended, remembering to save space for the Dissertation Approval Page in your research manuscript. Copies of your Approval Page will be returned to you by your program advisor. You will insert this page into every dissertation manuscript you decide to have hard bound – It is page 2 in the manual.
  16. Submit your final dissertation for binding to the Stritch library.
    • Fill out the form entitled “Cardinal Stritch University Dissertation Binding” and take it to the business office in Bonaventure Hall with the appropriate payment.
    • Take the receipt from the business office to the library reference desk along with the completed form and a SINGLE SIDED copy of your unbound FINAL dissertation (ONE copy is required for Library).
  17. Submit your final dissertation for copyright – Graduation requirement http://www.etdadmin.com/cgi-bin/home (By completing this process, your work will be able to be copyrighted and will be posted on the ProQuest site for electronic publication.)
  18. Complete the Survey of Earned Doctorates at: https://sed-ncses.org - Graduation requirement
  19. Send a copy of the completed Graduation Checklist to your advisor so you can be approved for graduation

    Graduation
  20. As you are scheduling a Final Oral Defense you should also apply for graduation. Complete the Application for Diploma by the applicable due date (March 1 for May graduation, August 15 for August graduation, and October 1 for December graduation). Please refer to the current University Graduate Catalog http://www.stritch.edu/Academics/Catalog for policy/procedure information.

VII. Timeline for Doctoral Programs

  Aug. Dec. May
Application for Graduation Deadline 8/15 10/1 3/1
Course Work Completion Deadline 8/15 12/1 5/1
Oral Defense Deadline 7/15 10/15 3/15
Completed Dissertation Submitted to Library 8/14 12/1 5/1
The dissertation must be submitted to the Library prior to the graduation date.
After the graduation you are officially a “Doctor”. After a successful oral defense you are “unofficially” a Doctor. Transform the world and you are truly a “Doctor”.

If a student does not pass the oral defense, (s)he must wait one year in order to defend again. If the student does not pass on the second attempt at the oral defense, the student will be academically dismissed from the Doctoral Program.

Information Specific to Particular Doctoral Programs - Leadership Doctoral Programs

A. Summer Institutes

Students must complete a total of three summer institutes. The summer institutes may not be completed as directed study courses. The topics for the summer institutes will vary each year, covering the main themes of leadership, learning, and service. Students must attend summer institutes at the Cardinal Stritch University main campus.

B. Faculty Advisor and Community Mentor

A faculty advisor is assigned early in the first year of study, based on the student’s background and goals. After completing one semester in the program, the student and faculty advisor collaborate to select a community mentor who will assist the student to achieve his or her goals. Together, the faculty advisor and community mentor support the student’s development in leadership opportunities during the course of study and practicum, and provide models for moral leadership, continuous learning, and socially significant service. Students must complete mentoring goals each of the three years in the program, provide yearly updates, and have the mentoring forms signed by the mentor. This is a graduation requirement.

C. Transfer Requirements

Students seeking a doctoral degree may request up to nine credits of coursework completed at another institution in a similar doctoral program to be evaluated at the point of admission and, if accepted, transfer to their program at Stritch. In order for the evaluation of the coursework to take place the applicant must:

  1. Have official transcripts sent to Stritch.
  2. Write a letter to the Chair of the Doctoral Leadership Dept., stating which course(s) should be considered for transfer.
  3. Include with the letter a syllabus of the course(s) to be evaluated for credit.

Submission of the request does not guarantee transfer of credit.

D. Residency Requirements

Residency refers to a minimum number of credits that must be taken at Stritch in order to receive a Stritch degree. All residency credits must be from the Doctoral program courses. Residency for the Doctoral Programs is 54 credits for the Ed.D. and 57 credits for the Ph.D. programs. Total credits for the programs are 63 for the Ed.D. and 66 credits for the Ph.D. minus any credits transferred into the Doctoral Programs in leadership.

Information Specific to Particular Doctoral Programs - Language and Literacy / Special Education Doctoral Programs

A. Residency Requirements

For the literacy and special education programs residency refers to a minimum number of credits that must be taken at Stritch in order to receive a Stritch degree. All residency credits must be from the doctoral program courses. Residency for the doctoral program is 54 credits.

B. Graduate Transfer Requirements

Due to the unique nature of the Doctorate in Language and Literacy and special education, it is expected that all studies and research will be completed at Cardinal Stritch University. The transfer of credits is rare. However, students may transfer up to six credits earned at another doctoral program from an accredited university or college. Subject matter must be relevant to Stritch’s doctoral program as determined by the faculty in the doctoral program. The courses must have been taken within the seven years at the time of graduation from Stritch. Transfer credits must have a grade of B or better or P in pass/fail (only if documentation is provided) course.

  • To facilitate transfer credits, have official transcripts sent to Stritch.
  • Write a letter to the Chair of the Doctoral Program stating which course(s) should be considered for transfer.
  • Include with the letter a syllabus of the course(s) to be evaluated for credit.